Arduino power consumption?

Hi, How long will an arduino last if I connect a 1000ma battery to it? When the code is running. I googled "arduino power consumption" but I couldn't find anything helpful.

THANKS!

It depends. This guide on power savings will explain.

If you're used a board like an Uno and battery voltage is high enough to not need boosting, 20 hours. If it needs boosting, less.

PocketHarambe101: Hi, How long will an arduino last if I connect a 1000ma battery to it? When the code is running. I googled "arduino power consumption" but I couldn't find anything helpful.

THANKS!

See post #1 for the answer, it really does depend on what the board is doing and driving.

Assuming you actually mean a 1000maHr battery, then the battery could last anything from a from a few hours to several years.

How much average power consumption for an AVR chip. Is there different power consumption between a heavy sketch and a light sketch (for example: the sketch has an empty loop)?

How much average power consumption for an AVR chip.

The data sheet for your chip will have information on how much current (power) is required for the chip under different conditions (clock frequency, temperature, etc.).

Software does not eat power. hardware does. Without knowing a lot more about your project we can't say more.

Most AVRs are in the ballpark of 10-20mA while running at typical arduino frequency and voltage. If you put the chip into sleep correctly (see Nick Gammons power management page - it's really good), the power consumption is much, much lower, under 1uA (that's micro amps!)

Most AVRs are in the ballpark of 10-20mA while running at typical arduino frequency and voltage.

Note that this is for the AVR chip itself. An Arduino Board like the Uno contains a bunch of other components, none of which were picked to allow for low power usage, and an Uno uses about 50mA. 20-40mA of that will NOT be affected by anything you do on the AVR. (This is all covered in Nick’s page, BTW.)

Is there different power consumption between a heavy sketch and a light sketch (for example: the sketch has an empty loop)?

In general, NO. An “empty” sketch still executes AVR instructions at the same rate as a “full” sketch; it’s just that the instructions aren’t doing anything useful. You have to explicitly add code to “stop” the processor from doing things if you want it to consume less power.

DrAzzy: If you put the chip into sleep correctly (see Nick Gammons power management page - it's really good), the power consumption is much, much lower, under 1uA (that's micro amps!)

To get close to 1uA or even less is not easy. You need standalone AVR doing nearly nothing: nothing moving, shining, doing sound. And sleeping over 99.99% of time! Also you need an external wake up to be able to enter the deepest sleep possible.

But when using sleep wisely the processor's power consumption will be neligible compared to other parts in most projects.