arduino pro mini or arduino nano

hi everyone, i have to do a project which will need a voice recognition remote. the remote will consist of voice recognition module V3 (4.5V~5.5V) and nRF24L01 wireless module (1.9V~3.6V). can you suggest me which arduino will be the best option to mount both V3 and Rf module on it? pro mini or nano??

Either one will work equally well, it's just up to you if you want on-board USB interface or not. The size difference is only about half an inch in length, same width.

INTP: Either one will work equally well, it's just up to you if you want on-board USB interface or not. The size difference is only about half an inch in length, same width.

but mini operates with only one reguator 3.3 V and the voice recognition module operates with 4.5~5.5 V..will it work?

The pro mini comes in a choice of voltages 3.3 or 5. The Nano is 5 volt but can power 3.3 volt devices (not much - say up to 50 mA). The nRF24L01 has 5 volt tolerant pins, but must be powered at 3.3 volt. You can buy an additional moule for the nRF24L01 which is fully 5 volt tolerant Power Module I'd probably get the Nano and the additional power module for the nrf24l01. The advantage of the nano over the pro mini is the built in USB interface (a) for programming it and (b) for powering the application later over a 5 volt USB charger.

Make sure you get the 5V version.

Unless you need on-board USB serial adapter, use a pro mini. If you're going to be putting it into a battery operated situation, that particularly recommends a pro mini, since the USB-serial adapter on the Nano would be sitting there drawing current and shortening battery life even when the remote wasn't in use.

Is that the EasyVR V3.0 you're talking about? I'm pretty sure you can run those on 3.3v by changing some jumpers, see the docs. Also, I could never make those things work well enough to do anything with - 5~10% success recognizing SD phrases was all I could get, making it utterly useless. I gave up and got an Amazon Echo, and have a python script on a raspberry pi that emulates WeMo outlets and a Hue bulb, and so I use the Echo for the voice recognition, and it is incredibly good at voice recognition, and it can do all sorts of other things. Had everything working in a couple of evenings, vs weeks of wasted time shouting (well, more like chanting) at the EasyVR.

Voice recognition is NOT easy - a friend of mine, a Cambridge maths postgrad, spent months on this problem with a big processor, and was never happy with his results.

regards Allan