Arduino Pro Mini Qn

http://www.sgbotic.com/index.php?dispatch=products.view&product_id=424

Guys, above is the link to the Ardunio Pro Mini that i thought of buying. I have always been using an Ardunio Duemilanove.

If you look at picture 4 of the link, it shows the Arduino Pro Mini being connected to a Xbee Explorer Regulated + Xbee.
Below is the link to the Xbee Explorer Regulated

http://www.sgbotic.com/index.php?dispatch=products.view&product_id=434

I was wondering if i can stick the Arduino Pro Mini and Xbee Explorer Regulated together. I want it to be as thin as possible.

Can that be done?

If you read the XBee specs, I think you'll find you don't need much more connected than Rx, Tx, Power, Ground, which are all available on the 6 pins at the end of the promini. Could probably lay them end to end next to each other & wire pin to pin, skip the female header that is shown there.

I think you want a 3.3V Promini as well, or add in a 3.3V regulator for the xbee.

Thx guys for the posts. :)I will be getting one! I still have some doubts though.
CrossRoads, your suggestion is good. :slight_smile: To connect the Xbee and Pro Mini side by side.

Do i need to add in a 3.3V regulator if i buy a Arduino Pro Mini 3.3V instead of a Arduino Pro Mini 5V for the Xbee?

I still do not know if i can stick the Arduino Pro Mini 5V with a Xbee Explorer Regulated back to back. Is that possible? I know i need small connecters.

Thank guys!! :slight_smile:

If you hotglue the promini to a thin piece of plastic and then hotglue that to the regulator, I don't see how you could get much thinner.

http://www.sgbotic.com/products/datasheets/wireless/XBee-Regulated-v10.pdf

From the regulator schematic, it appears that it is expecting 5V to come in from the connector that the promini connects to, which it knocks down to 3.3V for the Xbee to use. In that case, go with the 5V 16MHz Promini, and let the promini's 6-pin connecter be the 5V source to the regulator. Are you going to permanently connect these? You could just drop lengths of wire thru the holes in the 2 boards and solder them together, don't mess with connectors.

Seems kind of silly to have the Promini regulate 7+V down to 5V, only to have the XBee regulate it down again to 3.3V. How are you powering the promini? Couple of 3.7V Li batteries in series?

The Arduino Pro Mini is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega168 (datasheet). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, an on-board resonator, a reset button, and holes for mounting pin headers. A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or Sparkfun breakout board to provide USB power and communication to the board.

So, tell us something we didn’t already know that would be helpful here?
The original post has a link to a picture of a promini connected to the xbee shield.

The Arduino Pro Mini will be powered up by an external 9V battery source to the RAW and Gnd pins.

I m going to permanently connect these after uploading my program onto the Arduino Pro Mini using the FTDI 5V Breakout Board.

You could just drop lengths of wire thru the holes in the 2 boards and solder them together, don't mess with connectors. Said by CrossRoads

I understand what you are saying. In that case, i dont need to stick the Breakout Board and Xbee Explorer Regulated together. I will just use multicore (flexible) wires and solder the respective pins together.

Thanks for your help people. Appreciate lots :)

What is it about hot-glueing the Mini to a thin plastic? :)

Do i need that? :)

The plastic is just a suggestion to keep the pins on the back of the pro mini isolated from the xbee shield pins if you wanted to stack them up. You can mount them any way you see fit with your batteries. 9v squarish battery won't give long life tho. 6 AAs wired up together would last much longer. Experiment - 3 AAs into Promini VCC pin (instead of RAW) will work just fine, you'll have to see if XBee can regulate 4.5 down to 3.3 okay or not,or if it needs that extra 1/2 volt. No part number shown on the xbee regulator schematic.

G'night ...