arduino programming

How do you guys concentrate on programming only.
I'm trying to focus only on coding first as it is my weakest point
But each time I code, I have to connect a breadboard to test out the code.
Is there a easier method?

Technic168:
How do you guys concentrate on programming only.
I'm trying to focus only on coding first as it is my weakest point
But each time I code, I have to connect a breadboard to test out the code.
Is there a easier method?

What do you mean by easier method?

You mean something like virtual reality? Give an example of the system that you want to test. Is it like LEDs blinking etc?

By "breadboard" do you mean the arduino? I always thought the arduino was a great thing for testing code. Sure beats the days when I'd write some code to program a micro (Microchip's PIC back then as well as assembly code), program the chip, take it out of the programmer (before the days of ISP) and put it into the board, then have it flash some LEDs or something to see if it was working. :-/

Sorry to have gotten side-tracked.

There's arduino simulators that you can code in and test right away too. I used one once, but can't recall where I got it, but "googling" should find one.

I'm actually refering to kit on a shield.
It is difficult to get it from my country, so I'm looking at something similar

Try searching for 'arduino multifunction shield'.

dannable:
Try searching for 'arduino multifunction shield'.

That's pretty cool. Great price too!
I was about to suggest using some LED's plugged into the header for some code tests, and scope for things related to things like i2c/spi - but kind of a hassle doing it that way.

I'm trying to focus only on coding first as it is my weakest point
But each time I code, I have to connect a breadboard to test out the code.

You've got to have the hardware first because that's the only way to test & debug your code.

The last thing you want is a bunch of untested code because it can be almost impossible to find the bugs. If you write & test a few lines of code at a time, or one function at a time, etc., you know where the problems are.

And, it's interactive... You need the hardware to test the software and you need the software to test the hardware, and sometimes you don't know which is the problem.

Sometimes you don't need all of the hardware... If you are going to turn-on a relay or run a motor, sometimes you can use an LED to simulate the hardware. Or, you can use a pot to simulate a temperature sensor, etc.

Or, you can simulate something like a temperature sensor in software if you're working on the output-part of your program. But, eventually you'll need to connect the real thing and make sure it's working.