Arduino project for convert movement to electricity

Hi

I want to make a arduino based model in order to convert movement to electricity, that when move this part , it produce a electricity for turn on the led , Can anyone help me about this work ?

No Arduino is required, you only route the produced energy through the LED.

But I doubt that you can produce enough energy (voltage and current) by moving something around. Eventually push a magnet through a big coil...

Thanks DrDiettrich

I want to use this mechanism for toys. Is there any solution for this case?

If you get a small DC motor and rotate the shaft with your fingers it will generate a small amount of electricity.

...R

Maybe somthing like this breakout board:

keyvan_h:
when move this part , it produce a electricity for turn on the led

Move what exact part?

You can flash a led by tapping on a piezo disk. How bright it gets depends on the tap.

There is at least 1 Youtube video showing a led soldered directly to a piezo disk flash when the disk was tapped but to make it look real good they had to turn out the lights. Many fast taps makes many flashes.

Another has a 4 diode full wave rectifier and capacitor to store charge and led that shines longer after the tapping stops. Search words; piezo generator.

Could a wheel with bumps turn to tap a piezo or 4?

keyvan_h:
I want to use this mechanism for toys. Is there any solution for this case?

Research the "shake torch".

Paul__B:
Research the "shake torch".

I bought a box of those several years ago to use as gifts. Then I found you didn't need to shake them because they had two non-rechargable coin cells in series to power the LED. Fake to get you to buy. Got my my money back and still have several in a closet. Still work without shaking!

Paul

How well do they work w/o the coin cells?

Paul__B:
Research the "shake torch".

Good for improving your wrist action.

...R

GoForSmoke:
How well do they work w/o the coin cells?

They don't. The LED will flash while shaking, but nothing when quite.

Paul

If it flashes bright enough, a cap might get it to shine for a whole second or so?

I have one of those old crank flashlights that actually charges a battery but the battery did die. I got 3 leds bright when turning the crank and about 1 second when the crank stops but it does make enough light to read by. I’m just not sure a little kid could push that hard.

GoForSmoke:
If it flashes bright enough, a cap might get it to shine for a whole second or so?

I have played around with one of them a while ago. Mine was without power cell but with a capacitator. If you shake it for a while the LED will work for about the same time. But The LED was very faint. Piece of **** if you ask me.

I bought it because I was wondering if a similar system could power a modified Arduino Nano.

If something shakes it fast for a long time it could run a 328P chip. You might have to limit IO and clock it slower, at 8MHz the chip needs 3V to run, I think that 1.8V operation is possible. The slower it runs the less current it needs and just b.t.w

The C64 ran on a 1 MHz 6510 (improved 6502) and could do quite a bit for a toy. At the same clock rate, the AVR cpu is far advanced and will outperform the 6510 easily. Mundane projects don't even need the power of an AVR core at 1 MHz.

Thank you for that information. I have never really checked out the 328P chip.

I have a bigger version of the “shaking torch” at work and if you shake it for 2 min it can keep a modified Arduino Nano (underclocked, hardware modifications, sleep…) and some other stuff running for more than 2h.

When it comes to minimalistic systems I do not have much experience. But it’s very intriguing to read your post about it.

The Arduino site has a build your own on a breadboard page that only covers the 328P-PA chip. It took editing a different chip ID into a core file to get it working with the 328P-PU version that acts the same otherwise but costs less. I know that from 2012.

Nick Gammon has a roll your own tutorial with extra software that takes the chip ID pain out of the process, it's much easier. His tutorial also covers the "Mighty" 1284P, a 40-pin AVR with 16K RAM and 2 hardware serial ports. Budvar10 makes an Arduino Pro board with a surface mount 1284P and option for 24 MHz overclock ... I couldn't resist, it actually works w/o getting warm at 50% > standard clock. The chip is rated for 20 but overclocking chips is not exactly a new thing!

Even if you never use a breadboard duino, this is how to bootload your own replacement 328P's for Uno Rev 3's using an Arduino as chip programmer. It's good for most DIP AVR's though you'd have to get core files for some.

http://gammon.com.au/breadboard

LowArt:
When it comes to minimalistic systems I do not have much experience. But it’s very intriguing to read your post about it.

An Uno is pretty tight but 32K flash can pack a lot of what would take RAM on a PC. If you add an SD card it really opens up.

A Nano has a USB chip to power as well as a surface mount 328P.

Google up obaka arduino. Obaka is supposed to be useless, it's art. He built an Arduino right on a bare chip, soldered to the pins bypass cap, reset resistor and button, led13, ICSP header and power pins. But it can be put in a breadboard and used so is a failed Obaka.

Paul_KD7HB:
I bought a box of those several years ago to use as gifts. Then I found you didn't need to shake them because they had two non-rechargeable coin cells in series to power the LED.

How do you know they are non-rechargeable? These torches did use batteries, not capacitors.

what 's the mechanism of this soccer ball?