Arduino Reacting To a Sound to Make My Computer Turn On?

Hello, I was just thinking about how I could add some coolness to my Computer and I had an Idea, What if you could walk in your room and say "wake Up" or Make a sound that it recognizes to then turn on my computer​. I think it should be pretty easy but I have no idea on how to do it! So I come to you for help... How Would I do this, The motherboard connectors just need to be shorted out by a switch to turn the computer on so If I housed the Arduino inside with a small microphone coming out the side could I make it turn on? Also I suppose I could use a wall adapter to power it or is there other methods to power it like molex?

If you have any Ideas, Thanks, If No No Problem.
Doug :smiley:

I think it should be pretty easy but I have no idea on how to do it!

Well, then, how easy can it be? Voice recognition is (way) beyond the capabilities of the Arduino.

If all you want is for any sound to trigger turning the computer on, then that is easy.

Should be coming to Windows 10 (and Intel) next year perhaps.

If you want to do your own then you'll need to use something like a Raspberry Pi.

Essentially using an 'always on' miniature computer to switch on a bigger computer.

Or you could possibly use an "EasyVR" shield connected to an Arduino.
i've never used one, so don't know how good the voice recognition really is.
Some say good, others say it's rubbish.

Voice recognition may be beyond the Arduino's abilities, but tone recognition is simple. You may need a little analog circuitry, however.

Here's the outline: buy an electret mic with amplifier from Sparkfun or Adafruit (I forget which, but at least one of them sells such a unit). Use a comparator (very simple opamp circuit) to convert the audio waveform to a square wave. If you whistle a constant tone, you'll get a square wave at that frequency.

So feed the square wave to an interrupt pin, and all the interrupt does is add up received square waves until some fixed number is established, say 100. If those 100 square waves arrived in, say, 0.1 sec. Then a 1000 hz. tone was heard.

I used this successfully in several circuits. Best to use quite high tones, above most environmental noise, and adjust the sensitivity of the amp so that the detection process will only pick up a relatively loud tone.

I set this up to detect a smoke detector tone (6KHz.), and had no false alarms in days of testing. Of course 6KHz. may be a bit high for a whistle, but I did this for some whistled tones around 2 KHz.

An EasyVR board (plus cheap Arduino clone) and a Raspberry Pi are about the same price.

Raspberry Pi = flexibility plus the complexity of Linux.
EasyVR = single purpose, but hopefully less complex.

If the EasyVR doesn't perform well enough then you have a $50 paper weight.
If the Raspberry Pi voice recognition software isn't good enough then you could use it for some other project.

Horses for courses, your choice.

mikb55:
An EasyVR board (plus cheap Arduino clone) and a Raspberry Pi are about the same price.

Raspberry Pi = flexibility plus the complexity of Linux.
EasyVR = single purpose, but hopefully less complex.

If the EasyVR doesn't perform well enough then you have a $50 paper weight.
If the Raspberry Pi voice recognition software isn't good enough then you could use it for some other project.

Horses for courses, your choice.

That's fair enough, but since these are the Arduino forums, I thought I'd suggest something that actually used an Arduino.