Arduino Serial Monitor

Hi Guys,

How can I check if the arduino is dead or alive ?

Sometimes I can get values on my serial monitor and sometimes not. (Blank screen).

I’ve checked the COM-port and also checked the driver…but both are correctly installed and set up.

Is my arduino dead or how can I check if my arduino is dead ?
What could be more the reason ?

how can I check if my arduino is dead ?

Run the Blink sketch.

If that doesn't work, test it with a multimeter.

Disconnect it for a while and try again. There is a fuse in your Arduino that resets when you disconnect the power.

JoDuino:
I've tried the blink skecht....it runs properly

Then make a copy of the blink sketch and make a small change to it - just enough so you will know if the new version works. And try that.

If that works add these two lines in setup()

Serial.begin(9600);
Serial.println("Hooray, here I am");

And see if that version works. Make sure the Serial Monitor is also set to 9600 baud.

...R

Looks fine to me. But why did you not do it the way I suggested? Then it would only have printed Hooray once.

...R

             if(led = HIGH){

Assigning the value HIGH to led in an if statement does not make sense. Did you mean to use ==?

Why would you be comparing the pin NUMBER to HIGH? Done properly, 13 is not equal to 1, so no printing should happen.

Because 1 != 13

(don’t know what you mean with 1!=13)

"One (aka HIGH) is not equal to thirteen(aka led)

Still a blank serial monitor... GRRR I get annoyed with it...! Please help me.

void setup() {
 
}

You need to add Serial.begin(your baud rate here); to setup. You will need to select a matching baud rate when you open the monitor window. You had it correct in one of your earlier postings.

because 'led' is just the pin where the led is located. To see the state you need to do a digitalRead(led).

JoDuino:
Still a blank serial monitor... GRRR I get annoyed with it...! Please help me.

I don't know how much simpler I can explain it than in Reply #4

Put code in setup() to print a short message when the Arduino starts (or resets). That will give you confidence that the communication with the PC is working properly. If you choose the message carefully it will also reassure you that the program you want is actually loaded into the Arduino.

When you are programming start with something that works and expand from there one step at a time. The alternative is floundering and frustration.

...R

int sensorPin0 = A3; // select the input pin for the potentiometer
int sensorPin1 = A3; // select the input pin for the potentiometer
int sensorPin2 = A3; // select the input pin for the potentiometer
int sensorPin3 = A3; // select the input pin for the potentiometer
int sensorPin4 = A3; // select the input pin for the potentiometer
int sensorPin5 = A3; // select the input pin for the potentiometer

Haven’t you noticed that you only use A3?
Try

// select the input pin for the potentiometer
int sensorPin0 = A0;
int sensorPin1 = A1;
int sensorPin2 = A2;
int sensorPin3 = A3;
int sensorPin4 = A4;
int sensorPin5 = A5;