Arduino speed

Hello.

Extreme novice here.
Looking at Youtube I have seen a few Arduino projects. Some move very slowly and some are very quick to react. Some are jerky some are smooth in motion. My question is: Is this the result of the programing, the hardware used, the signal processing?

I realize that my project is something covered many times using arduino and all sorts of other equipment.
I have somewhat successfully used a windshield wiper motor (I know everyone has done it) to act as a large servo. I used an H-bridge, the guts of an rc servo, remotely located a larger (5K pot) to monitor the motor shaft and a servo tester to supply the PWM signal.

I did find that using a rear wiper motor from a vehicle is much easier than using a front windshield wiper motor as the front has many functions. The motor would often rotate to its own home location even when the tester used its own centering location. I had to locate and alter the circuit boards home location.

My question is: When moving the potentiometer on the tester (mode/manual) quickly everything is very smooth. Moving the pot slowly created a jerky movement. Does anyone know if this is because of the large motor/large windings being used compared to what the rc servo was designed for. Is it the frequency of the PWM of the servo design, could this frequency be increased from say 15Hz to 30Hz or something like this. Is there a different type motor, brushless dc?

My objective is to make a type of flight simulator but for a boat. I realize boats come with REALLY expensive attitude adjustment systems yet they are very slow to move into position. I need a system that will constantly level the boat in pitch and roll. The electronics of flight controllers and PWM signal is just what I needed UNTIL I found that because of the distance of 20 feet from one actuator to the other the PWM signal doesn't seem to reach far enough.

Would the Arduino software/signal or signal repeater be able to work in a system where it would run a long distance like this. Could one arduino synchronize with another. Does any of this make sense. Self levelling simulators work great but at a distance of twenty feet and the use of a PWM signal. Will this work. Thanks for your time.

weldone:
My objective is to make a type of flight simulator but for a boat. I realize boats come with REALLY expensive attitude adjustment systems yet they are very slow to move into position. I need a system that will constantly level the boat in pitch and roll.

...

Does any of this make sense.

Not a great deal.

I have owned a real sailing boat and a canal boat as well as some model boats. None of them had any system to level them in pitch and roll. Large cruise liners do have stabilizers to reduce roll but it would be quite impossible to stabilize pitch.

I suspect that the (unspecified) examples you mention where there was a jerky response was due to poor programming.

What wiper motors have to do with pitch and roll in boats boggles the mind.

...R

Oops, I guess this is not the place for generic questions. Sorry I am not as smart as you.

*The wiper motor was to operate the up and down movement of trim tabs.

  • "the (unspecified) programing examples only involved the factory servo that was purchased at the hobby shop. The internal parts were removed and the potentiometer was replaced and used (like/similar to) an encoder revealing the position of the rotation of the shaft/axle.

  • There are lots of boats that have hydraulic actuators that control roll.....lots of them. The pitch would be something new...my idea....not on the market yet.

weldone:
The pitch would be something new...my idea....not on the market yet.

Don't invest too much in it :slight_smile:

I guess the boats that properly resist pitch and roll are the semi-submersible drilling vessels.

...R

Robin2

Just because you don’t know something doesn’t mean it doesn’t actually exist. “A few hours of reading and thinking will solve the problem”… of being mean spirited to a complete novice trying to learn something.

You have owned boats and haven’t known about trim tabs, lead keels, or centerboards…I think they pretty much are trying to control some of the “roll”. You know, when the boat is rolling over onto its side. WOW…I will get rid of my registration right away. (An electric/electronic arm/actuator instead of a hydraulic trim system).

You (guess) the boats that properly resist pitch and roll are the semi-submersible drilling vessels…yes them too. There are several more,

weldone:
You have owned boats and haven't known about trim tabs, lead keels, or centerboards...

Gee golly. I never heard of any of those. What do they do?

If you have come here to bitch, I will leave you to it.

I had assumed you wanted useful advice.

...R