Arduino to power breadboard

Hello, This is my first post and I'm new to the (practical) world of electronics.

I have a very basic understanding of electronics like, P=VI, calculating parallel and series resistance, etc... But have never really put this understanding into practice.

I would like to start with simple circuits on a bread board.

Can I use the Arduino simply as a power supply for a breadboard? I figure, why deal with batteries or buy/build a power supply and then later buy an arduino, if I can buy the arduino right off the bat.

I'm also trying to decide if (when I'm ready), the raspberry pi would be a better option than the arduino. SO I guess same question for the raspberry pi. Can it be used purely as a power supply for a breadboard.

If it helps, I will start with simple analog circuits, maybe RLC filters, an LED circuit, etc...

TIA.

You can use the output from the Arduino 5v pin to provide a limited amount of power for a breadboard - say 200 - 300 mA.

If you need more power than that you will need a separate power supply. The ground from the separate power supply and the Arduino ground should be connected.

The digital I/O pins on the Arduino can only supply a max of 40mA and 20mA is more realistic. And I think the max for all digital pins must be less than 200mA.

If you want to use one of the digital pins to light an LED remember to include a current limiting resistor - anything from 470 ohms to 4700 ohms should be fine.

...R

Hi and welcome. Yes, you can power your breadboard circuit from the Arduino. But USB can only supply max 500mA, of which an Arduino like UNO itself will use less than 50mA. Thats still plenty for most experiments. Just don't go mad with dozens of leds!

I would recommend Arduino over RPi for simple experiments and learning, every time. I own both and don't use the RPi for much at all.

I would also reccomend a breadboard compatible Arduino like a Nano 3, for you, as a "breadboarder" like me, rather than a shield type of person. Why get an Uno and then have to have a spaghetti-like tangle of wires connecting it to your breadboard?

Paul

PaulRB: Hi and welcome. Yes, you can power your breadboard circuit from the Arduino. But USB can only supply max 500mA, of which an Arduino like UNO itself will use less than 50mA. Thats still plenty for most experiments. Just don't go mad with dozens of leds!

I would recommend Arduino over RPi for simple experiments and learning, every time. I own both and don't use the RPi for much at all.

I would also reccomend a breadboard compatible Arduino like a Nano 3, for you, as a "breadboarder" like me, rather than a shield type of person. Why get an Uno and then have to have a spaghetti-like tangle of wires connecting it to your breadboard?

Paul

I agree, for breadboarding it's hard to discount the ease of use of the arduino Nano type board. Plus it's not hard to burn the Uno bootloader into a Nano and get the same higher baudrate on upload and a small increase in flash sketch space.

I bought a Micro for that reason. It's pretty much a Leonardo in a DIP package (the same size as the Nano, PRO, etc), with a newer processor and a few extra goodies in comparison.

The Micro uses the 32u4, which doesn't have a separate USB->serial chip. The main processor does USB communications by itself, and can 'pretend' to be a mouse and keyboard at the same time. Quite a bit of additional functionality over an Uno, in that sense.

Unless I need the Mega or Ruggeduino, I grab the Micro right off the bat.

If you do get a small form factor board (such as the Micro, Nano, Pro), buy a chip socket, a ZIF, or something like that to save wear and tear on the actual header pins of the Arduino. I'd much rather bend a $0.50 cent sockets leg than having the resolder the pin on the main board.

It works better for me that way, and thought I'd share the tip! If you go the cheap socket way, make sure it has long enough male pins, as some sockets have really short pins!

PaulRB: Hi and welcome. Yes, you can power your breadboard circuit from the Arduino. But USB can only supply max 500mA, of which an Arduino like UNO itself will use less than 50mA. Thats still plenty for most experiments. Just don't go mad with dozens of leds!

I would recommend Arduino over RPi for simple experiments and learning, every time. I own both and don't use the RPi for much at all.

I would also reccomend a breadboard compatible Arduino like a Nano 3, for you, as a "breadboarder" like me, rather than a shield type of person. Why get an Uno and then have to have a spaghetti-like tangle of wires connecting it to your breadboard?

Paul

Thanks for the tip. I'll take a look at the Nano3.

jrlp: If you do get a small form factor board (such as the Micro, Nano, Pro), buy a chip socket, a ZIF, or something like that to save wear and tear on the actual header pins of the Arduino. I'd much rather bend a $0.50 cent sockets leg than having the resolder the pin on the main board.

Is this what I would need? https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9175

Thanks.

[quote author=dropthetrends link=topic=232781.msg1677571#msg1677571 ] Is this what I would need? https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9175 [/quote]

That's a lot more than 50c. You can get a Nano 3 from China for not much more than that socket. Can't see the length of the pins in that picture either. I'm not sure what type of socket jrlp is talking about, but in my experience trying to use sockets in breadboards is likely to cause poor connection issues and potentially a lot of head scratching. I can usually get Nano/Micro out of the breadboard without any problems, but once or twice I have bent pins, ive just straightened them with pliers.