Arduino Uno and Esp-03 Wiring

Hi I’m just wondering if anyone can check this over to see any problems with the way I have my esp8266 Esp-03 wired up to my arduino. I’m not 100% sure of what I’m doing but my initial thoughts on how it should be wired are provided in the picture.

  1. Will this setup fry the esp-03?
  2. Will my arduino provide enough amperage (maybe I mean current) to create a meaningful signal from my esp-03?
  3. Will this setup provide any meaningful communication between my Networked device to and from my Arduino?

If possible use simplistic terms as I am very new to working with hardware and I would love any recommended tutorials or readings to get me started.

I’m basically trying to make something that can give commands to the arduino and allow my phone to receive info from an infrared sensor attached to the arduino (maybe i need to use the GPIO pins for this).

http://imgur.com/6m7mAM0 in case you don't wanna download the attachment, new to this forum also.

Hi iKingJames

You have the ESP RX pin connected directly to the Arduino TX. Officially, the ESP modules (which run on 3.3V) are not tolerant of 5V inputs (from the 5V Arduino), so there is a risk of damaging the ESP input. You may get away with it, but :wink:

In the other direction, the 3.3V output from the ESP won't damage the Arduino but may not be enough to be read correctly.

Options:

You are right to ask about the current drawn by the ESP from the Arduino 3.3V output. Peak current draw of the ESP (200mA) is higher than rated current of the 3.3V output (50mA). Better to use something like this to power the ESP: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1PCS-Breadboard-Power-Supply-Module-3-3V-5V-MB102-Solderless-Bread-Board-DIY-New-/221280574563?_trksid=p2141725.m3641.l6368

The other ESP connections look OK. If you ever want to use GPIO15 as an IO pin, you can connect it to GND through a 10K resistor rather than directly.

  1. Will this setup provide any meaningful communication between my Networked device to and from my Arduino?

I'm basically trying to make something that can give commands to the arduino and allow my phone to receive info from an infrared sensor attached to the arduino (maybe i need to use the GPIO pins for this).

The ESP can be loaded with different firmwares to provide different sets of features accessed via the serial port. It is also possible to run Arduino programs (with some limitations) directly on the ESP. Which approach / which firmware to choose depends on understanding the requirements.

Regards

Ray

Hi, after seeking help I think I can do what I want to accomplish without and arduino. I am interested in what you mentioned about the MB102 breadboard power supply but the datasheet for that part is listed at an avg current of 1amp. MB102 datasheet(1/2 Pages) MCC | 10 Amp Single Phase Bridge Rectifier 50 to 1000 Volts

My new question is, what would be the minimum requirements to get a simple test done on the esp-03 using the MB102 breadboard power supply? I just want to test to see if the esp-03 is even working to get started. Any program recommendation for primitive communication to the module from my phone or computer?

Thanks again!

Hi,
You are using pin0 and pin1 on the UNO to comm with the GPS, they are the UNO programming pins, use pin2 and pin3 instead for the GPS.

Tom.... :slight_smile:

I am interested in what you mentioned about the MB102 breadboard power supply but the datasheet for that part is listed at an avg current of 1amp. http://html.alldatasheet.com/html-pdf/74157/MCC/MB102/44/1/MB102.html

The 1A figure will be the maximum that the supply can provide. The ESP draws 200mA which is much lower. The supply can’t “force” more current into the ESP than the ESP draws, so it is safe to use.

what would be the minimum requirements to get a simple test done on the esp-03 using the MB102 breadboard power supply? I just want to test to see if the esp-03 is even working to get started.

Instead of using an Arduino to control the ESP over its serial port, use a USB-serial converter like this: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FTDI-FT232RL-USB-to-TTL-Serial-Converter-Adapter-Module-5V-and-3-3V-For-Arduino-/221552218333?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item33958a90dd

Connect your ESP to the power supply, with the other pin connections as in your diagram. Set the USB-serial to 3.3V with the onboard jumper, connect its GND to ESP GND, and TX and RX as you had the Arduino TX and RX.

Use a free terminal program such as PuTTY.

By default, the ESP will be loaded with firmware that lets you control it over serial with a set of AT commands: to connect to wifi, to connect to a web server, to send HTTP requests and receive HTTP responses.

I used the attached tutorial when I started using the ESP. It will let you know if your ESP is working correctly.

ESP8266_WiFi_Module_Quick_Start_Guide_v_1.0.4.pdf (700 KB)

Any program recommendation for primitive communication to the module from my phone or computer?

Try Blynk.

Using an ESP8266-01 as a standalone I loaded a sketch onto it via the Arduino IDE.

With my iphone and using the Blynk app I can turn an led attached to the ESP8266 (no Arduino necessary) on or off from anyplace in the world.

Recently ordered some ESP8266-12's to expand the GPIO availability.

Geez! Wifi, a microcontroller and significant IO for about $4! Very enabling.

  • Scotty