Arduino UNO by Adafruit misses assembled ICSP pins to programa ATmega16U2

It's really a shame.

And it still costs 24,95$.

Well, guys, are you joking?

Be aware that this price also includes money for maintaining and developing the code and the forum (and probably more)

Clone buyers do not pay for that, but still ask questions here (and still get an answer normally)

So what is the shame?

There's no assembled ICSP pins to program ATmega16U2. Original UNO had it.

Well, just solder in a 2x3 block of pins. And while you're at it, solder in the JP2 pins as well.

This seems a really weird thing to complain about; I haven't seen many people say anything about using these pins, and IIRC there are other ways to load new firmware into the 16u2. And the pads are still there, so it'd be easy to use some sort of Pogo-Pin arrangement or solder on a header, for the cases where you do need to reprogram...

Sorry for my ignorance, but I don’t know other ways to load new firmware into the 16u2. If you could showm me any, I withdraw my complaint. Thanks!!

The easiest way to load new firmware into the 16u2 is with Atmel FLIP. (Don’t have the link right now, but google it.) You will need a wire to reset the chip.

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Hacking/DFUProgramming8U2

Yes, I know. But, as above link states: "To reset the 8u2, briefly bridge the reset pin with the ground. **The pins are located near the USB connector, as shown in this picture.**Connect them briefly with a piece of wire. "

My complaint is these pins aren’t there in new Arduino UNO: you have to solder them before

You can stick a wire in the holes. Or connect a wire to a ground pin and the reset pin of the 16u2. You will just have to tap it.

I'm voting with Osqui on this one... at least drill the board and plate the holes... near zero cost. At the price being charged, the pin headers should be thrown in free.

We're entering a whole new Arduino world and I do not like everything I see.

Ray

at least drill the board and plate the holes.

I believe that the holes are present, drilled, plated, and filled with solder, aren't they? ("Metro" doesn't have them, but it doesn't have a 16u2, either...) If you want to short gnd/reset to load new 16u2 firmware "occasionally", the resulting tinned pads shouldn't be any harder to use than mounted pin-headers (maybe easier.) If you wanted to to it "often", you might miss the header...

to load new 16u2 firmware "occasionally", the resulting tinned pads shouldn't be any harder to use than mounted pin-headers

I cannot argue with that.

Ray