Arduino UNO works under vacuum?

Working on a project where the Arduino Uno would have to work in a vacuum environment and at a temperature near 0 Kelvin. Will the Arduino be able to withstand the vacuum?

Thank you!

Pressure - not spec'ed in the datasheet.
Temperature - only spec'ed do to -40C, so -40Kelvin would be a problem.
Think you'll have a hard time finding anything that goes lower than -55C, which is military temperature range.

…at a temperature near 0 Kelvin…

I suspect the semiconductors within the processor are going to behave a bit differently at the temperature. A quick Google search indicates “insulator” is the new behaviour.

It's interesting that metals conduct better at lower temperatures, (superconductors), but semiconductors become worse at conducting, (insulators).

It will probably suck the magic smoke out

arantzatm:
Working on a project where the Arduino Uno would have to work in a vacuum environment and at a temperature near 0 Kelvin. Will the Arduino be able to withstand the vacuum?

OK, I'll call your bluff.

How could you possibly be operating it near absolute zero? It simply is not going to happen. Do you mean in outer space? That is not zero Kelvin, though it can be cold.

As to the vacuum, it would probably be just fine if you replace the electrolytics with (military grade?) tantalum. And in a vacuum, it should keep itself warm by its own power dissipation.

If OP's in a lab sophisticated enough to have near vacuums and near absolute zero, money's clearly no object.

JimboZA:
If OP's in a lab sophisticated enough to have near vacuums and near absolute zero, money's clearly no object.

Then he wouldnt be using arduino, but Fpga or Texas Dsp or another.

Clearly 0 kelvin is no proyect for hobbist.

mart256:
Then he wouldnt be using arduino,

Yeah, that was pretty much my point.

There's this: https://www.ardusat.com/

Replace all electrolytic capacitors with ceramic multilayers ones and it will work.
In vacuum the heat is transferred only via radiation.
If you mean outer space, the temperature there depends on the position against Sun and the heat energy produced by the electronics (ie. a few hundred milliwats of heat by the arduino itself).
The temperature of pcbs in nanosatellites flying around Earth is about +20degress Centigrade.

If you talking near zero Kelvin in lab environment (ie a bath in liquid helium or something like that) it will not work as the chips will stop working (because of semiconductor physics).

Well the OP has left the building, so we may never know.

ChrisTenone:
Well the OP has left the building, so we may never know.

Maybe next we can make an Arduino-based submarine that can swim down through the lava of a volcano and report back what it sees…

dmjlambert:
and report back what it sees…

Except Arduinos are crap for video…

Maybe next we can make an Arduino-based submarine that can swim down through the lava of a volcano and report back what it sees...

A friend of mine used to build electronics for dropping down oil wells and recording measurements. CDP1802 writing to EPROM for storage, IIRC. (yes, real EPROM, with multiple power supplies, because that was what existed in those days, and would survive down-well temperatures...

While reading your post "Launch the Pig!" popped into my mind. In a previous life I did the user interface and data collection for pig management on a short pipeline in Michigan. The button to send the pig was labeled "Launch the Pig!" and included a whooshing sound effect.

A similar idea to down-well instrumentation but much more forgiving. Unless the pig catcher fails.

Brings to mind the Muppets bit, "Pigs in Space".