Arduino Uno

I recently bought an arduino uno, and I don't have any other arduino products. What can I do with just the arduino Uno?

You need a bit of miscellaneous hardware to go with it to get off to a good start.

Buy yourself some LEDs, mini pushbuttons, 10K and 220 ohm resistors, a breadboard and some hookup wire that fits the breadboard holes. That will get the ball rolling. (The 220 ohm resistors are for the LEDs, and the 10K resistors are useful for many things. Later you'll need a wider range of values.)

Then, just buy hardware like DC motors, servos, stepper motors, RF modules, SD card modules, RTC and other modules etc etc as you feel the need.

There's a hell of a lot of stuff available to play with. An eBay search with "Arduino" as the search term will give you some idea. Then there's sites like Sparkfun, Adafruit and many others with heaps of Arduino add-ons.

Welcome

What is your background?
.

You can learn a lot about Arduino programming with an Uno and nothing else. You can make the onboard led flash and you can write programs that display data on the Serial Monitor and take in data that you enter into the Serial Monitor.

If you have nothing more than a piece of wire that can fit into the sockets on the Uno board you can use that to mimic a switch by connecting one of the I/O pins to GND. Just ensure that the I/O pin has been set for INPUT, preferrable with pinMode(pin, INPUT_PULLUP);. If a pin is set for OUTPUT and you connect it directly to GND you may damage your Arduino.

...R

One really useful thing you can do with a bare Uno is to teach yourself to fade the LED on pin 13 up and down.

One of the best features of the Ardunios is the Serial Monitor where you can output program code data to the PCs screen and also send data back to the running program.

It allows you to mimic many things like LCD , output ports, communications.

You can write and run many programs without the need for any additional hardware, though as you progress it does help !

SpencerWhite:
What can I do with just the arduino Uno?

Apart from flashing the on-board LED, very little. But that's OK, you can spend some time browsing around this forum to see what you think might be interesting, and then have a go at that. You will need peripheral stuff, but thinking first and buying afterwards saves you from getting stuff you don't need.

Nick_Pyner:
getting stuff you don’t need.

There’s no such thing. A well-stuffed junk box is essential to electronic tinkering. I get stuff shipped all the time that looks OK in the catalog but when it arrives, I think “Well, that’s neat but I can’t use it.” I don’t “need” an Arduino Nano but I have one on hand just in case I find a project needs that particular size and capability.

I broke apart an old printer years ago. Then recently, I needed a surface mount diode urgently. I found one on the printer PCB, desoldered it and used it. That whole printer, the effort of dismantling it and storing it for years was totally worth it for that one moment when I needed a diode.

I ran the arduino 'blink' program with just the bare arduino. I don't think there is an onboard LED.

SpencerWhite:
I ran the arduino ‘blink’ program with just the bare arduino. I don’t think there is an onboard LED.

All UNOs, even clones, have an onboard LED. It’s connected to digital pin 13, and is located on the board near the pin 13 header socket. It’s labelled with an “L”.
When “Blink” is correctly uploaded to the board, the “L” LED should flash on and off at 0.5Hz, (1 second ‘on’, 1 second ‘off’), continuously.

Blink:-

// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board
void setup()
{
    // initialize digital pin 13 as an output.
    pinMode(13, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop()
{
    digitalWrite(13, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
    delay(1000);              // wait for a second
    digitalWrite(13, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
    delay(1000);              // wait for a second
}

SpencerWhite:
I ran the arduino 'blink' program with just the bare arduino. I don't think there is an onboard LED.

It sounds rather like you didn't run it, you just thought you did.

I understand some Unos come with Blink pre-installed. My Etherten did not.

MorganS:
That whole printer, the effort of dismantling it and storing it for years was totally worth it for that one moment when I needed a diode.

Not so easy to convince my wife that. :grinning:

(I have a heap of them in the garage. And at work ...)