Arduino viable for permanent installation?

Hello Arduino community,

Arduino hardware and software is amazing for creating and prototyping. I have utilized Arduino to help me create a Rain-Gauge project and a Cup-Anemometer project. Now that my projects are done I am interested in implementing them on my roof for continuous weather monitoring. Since I have never done this before, I don't have insight towards how people generally go about implementing finished projects.

So here are my questions. Would I have to create some sort of dedicated microcontroller circuit? or Is the Arduino plenty Viable for implementation use?(i hope so) Does it have any trouble continuously running a program for long periods of time? or is Arduino more for design purposes and proof of concept only?

I have heard that utilizing code such as "watch-dog-timers" to reset the program when things go wrong are necessary for long term implementation. But is this enough to categorize the Arduino as Adequate for continuous operation?

Basically I want to know if I implement my Arduino project for continuous use, will I be constantly having to restart the arduino and reset the code. Or does the Arduino handle long term operation pretty well?

Thanks in advance for your insight, - jd

or Is the Arduino plenty Viable for implementation use?(i hope so)

Yes.

Does it have any trouble continuously running a program for long periods of time?

No.

I have heard that utilizing code such as "watch-dog-timers" to reset the program when things go wrong are necessary for long term implementation.

I've never used a watchdog timer. I guess it depends on the kinds of things that might go wrong in your particular application. It would have to be the kind of failure where the processor (and related circuitry) is still functioning but for some reason it just needs a reset.

I made a car alarm with a different microcontroller about 20 years ago. It's built permanently on a "breadboard". It's still running 24/7 (the program runs even when the alarm is not armed) and It's never "crashed". The only time it gets reset is when the car battery dies and has to be replaced.

The Arduino is perfectly capable of operating for long periods of time. I've had a few arduino based devices performing simple tasks continuously in my apartment, and they've been working fine. The watchdog timers can serve as a backup, to automatically reset the MCU if things go wrong - but if code is written properly, they should only be for "cosmic ray handling" - AVR's are simple; with well written code and external hardware used appropriately, it should not need watchdog resets.

That creeping instability that so plagues computers (and to a lesser extent, mobile devices) left running without reboot for long periods of time is entirely due to crap software, obscured by the complexity of the system.

Most people switch from an Uno/etc to a Pro Mini clone when they tidy up a project for permanent use - the pro mini is small, and the clones are available for cup-of-coffee prices, so this has obvious advantages - while it uses the same processor as the Uno.

The main thing is - it isn't running Windoze!

To answer your question simply - if the Arduino (ATmega328) is not suitable for this - what else would you conceivably propose to use?

Awesome.

thanks for the feedback guys.

jD_666:
Hello Arduino community,

I have heard that utilizing code such as “watch-dog-timers” to reset the program when things go wrong are necessary for long term implementation. But is this enough to categorize the Arduino as Adequate for continuous operation?

I have used watch-dog-timers in data communications where a computer is asking a remote computer if it has a message for me or if it can accept a message. If the wait for completion of the communication sequence takes too long, meaning the remote is not there, or is busy, the timer allows the situation to be reset and the communication to be tried again later.

Paul

Terrible waste of a cute little Arduino and may suffer from bad or loose contacts, but as said, will work just fine.

I implore you to save your Arduino for a more productive and exciting life. Google 'BARE BONES ARDUINO' and consider building a replacement....