arduiono code for fire detecting

hi can any one help me to develop code for fire decting robot the robot will move in square and when fire is detected then buzzer will on

Don't double post it wastes time. Sounds like you may want to start with something more basic then work your way into this project. Go through the basic examples that come with the IDE and master them first. Maybe google, Arduino smoke detector.

Ready the sticky note at the top of the forum list.
1) Don’t cross post.[/glow]
2) Your circuit diagram is not shown.
3) Your code is not shown.

Are Arduino products, or Atmel microprocessors approved for use in fire detection systems?

...R

Are Arduino products, or Atmel microprocessors approved for use in fire detection systems?

For proof-of-concept? Why not? For production use? No.

@PaulS Is this somewhere in a datasheet? Where to find such info?

@asif1605 Everybody is willing to help you in the meaning of guiding you through the project. Detecting fire can be done in many ways - smoke particles, temperature, increase air flows, change in speed of sound etc What are your thoughts? Tell us more about your ideas so we can complement them.

@PaulS Is this somewhere in a datasheet? Where to find such info?

The AVR page describes what the ATMega328 (and other) chips can, and can not be used for. For non-production, "can I do this?" projects, I see nothing that says "No, not with our chips". For production, there are clear restrictions - no life saving equipment is the only one I remember.

But is that more a legal statement (avoid responsibility) than a technical statement?

I can imagine that an AVR can withstand 100C (212F) for a certain time before malfunction, but detecting a fire can be at much lower temperatures.

BTW with respect to heat resistant HW, recently some progress was made with transistors capable of handling up to 1500F - http://gizmodo.com/worlds-tiniest-plasma-transistor-can-make-supertough-e-1548040702 -

You are right to assume that the prohibitions are designed to protect Atmel's ass.

But the builder of a project also has to protect him/herself.

Imagine the scenario in court if someone dies or is seriously injured because your device did not function properly. Counsel for the prosecution will ask you "Did you ascertain from the manufacturer that the parts you used in your device were suitable for that application?"

The only answer is "NO" and the likely outcome is gaol.

As @PaulS says, its a different thing altogether if you are just establishing a proof of concept that will never be used outside the laboratory.

...R

Or personal use versus making a commercial product. - got it!.

this is a pretty well-known problem. There are commercial flame sensors http://www.banggood.com/Flame-Detection-Sensor-Module-KY-026-Flame-Sensor-Module-Red-Arduino-p-91806.html?currency=USD&utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_content=miko_ruby&utm_campaign=Electronic-xie-us&gclid=CJWNxpnhur0CFU1bfgodPYgA0w

and forum posts: http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=184357.15 google arduino flame sensor for more info.

basically, it's just an analog read from the sensor, point your robot where analog read is at its highest value and you've found fire! good luck :)

robtillaart: Or personal use versus making a commercial product. - got it!.

This is an area where personal use may be difficult to define. Fair enough if you are the only person exposed to the risk that the device is designed to detect.

But in many cases, even with a personal safety product, other people may be nearby - family or friends, for example. You have a duty not to expose them to unnecessary risks just as you would have a duty to customers if you are selling your product.

A big part of the complexity of a fire detection system is that fires are very infrequent. Most people go their entire lives without being faced with a dangerous fire that needs detecting. How can you be sure the detection system will operate when it is needed and not just in the laboratory with a brand new battery and a spider-free detector. And, unfortunately, if someone has a super-duper fire detection system they may (consciously or unconsciously) be more careless.

There is another current Thread about an elevator that may also have serious personal safety implications.

...R

An Arduino can't detect fire directly (except in the sense of letting smoke out of the Arduino) so you need to use a suitable sensor. The sensor you find should preferably be one that is easy to interface to an Arduino i.e. providing a simple digital output signal. How you drive that from an Arduino would depend on the details of the sensor you've chosen. In other words, your question can't be answered sensibly until you have sorted out what sensor(s) you're going to use.