Arduno Pro Mini Fried from European Voltage Levels...

Hey Everyone,

I bought an Arduino Pro mini and was using it in North America with a power adapter I bought. Has been working fine for months and when I went on a trip to europe and plugged it in, it fried immediately. My power adapter, however, was rated for 110V - 240V. So it should have been fine. I tested power adapter with my voltmeter and it was sending out 9V like it should...

So does anyone know why my arduino mini pro got fried?

Thanks

Hey Everyone,

I bought an Arduino Pro mini and was using it in North America with a power adapter I bought. Has been working fine for months and when I went on a trip to europe and plugged it in, it fried immediately. My power adapter, however, was rated for 110V - 240V. So it should have been fine. I tested power adapter with my voltmeter and it was sending out 9V like it should...

So does anyone know why my arduino mini pro got fried?

Thanks

So that would be "French fried"?

If it really was 9v then there would not have been a problem. It may be a cheap imitation power adaptor which is not capable of doing its job properly.

Well what's weird is that I did a test with a step-up transformer today (in North America). When I use the step-up transformer which brings 120V to 230V the adapter is fine and the arduino is fine... So why did it get fried in the Netherlands?

lemmings:
. So why did it get fried in the Netherlands?

Co-incidence perhaps? Maybe something else was going on that you didn't notice, like a wire shorting the board's 5V to Gnd, or something?

If it is a good certified power adapter, that should not be possible.
Could you make a photo of your power adapter ? or even better : open it to see what is inside :stuck_out_tongue:

There is a possibility that there was static electricity. However, since it is summer in Europe, the humidity is high and static electricity should not be a big problem.

lemmings:
Well what's weird is that I did a test with a step-up transformer today (in North America). When I use the step-up transformer which brings 120V to 230V the adapter is fine and the arduino is fine... So why did it get fried in the Netherlands?

In Europe not only the Voltage (230V nominal) differs from the US, but also the frequency.
Europe: 50 Hz
USA: 60 Hz

You'd not only have to check the voltage range 110...240 V, but also if the frequency range 50/60 Hz is supported by your power adapter.

Mainland Europe is 220V, UK 240V, these small differences in voltage and frequency
shouldn't matter at all to a universal switch-mode power supply... It might have been
poorly conditioned power (industrial, agricultural - UPS's are recommended in such harsh
environments.) Or a cheap sub-standard power supply unit (out of spec but holding
out at 110V apparently fine).

Over here in the Netherlands, the power grid is pretty stable.

  • I'm assuming you weren't on a river cruise at that moment (who takes their projects with them while doing that) ?

Over here we have 230 volts.
You might measure 227 - 230 volts at the sockets.
A modern adapter suitable for 115 and 230 volts is very likely to not care about frequency, as it will rectify that immediately and feed that to a switched power supply solution.
It wouldn't surprise me if you could even feed it a DC supply of 100 - 250 volts.

It's very unlikely that the power supply fails like that on one day, and works perfectly the next.
So i agree with JimboZA, must be coincidence.

It could be an earthing problem. What was your adapter socket like?

Thanks for the feedback everyone, very helpful, I'll look into it further and post my results.

9v=fry 5v=ok

9V @ VCC = Fried
9V @ RAW = Ok

@lemmings, do not cross-post. Threads merged.

aisc:
9V @ VCC = Fried
9V @ RAW = Ok

An Arduino does not withstand 9V on Vcc, rated max. is 5.5V.

DrDiettrich:
An Arduino does not withstand 9V on Vcc, rated max. is 5.5V.

Just wondering if u understand the usage of the term fried - because your comment implies u don't.
Fried = "Burnt out".

MarkT:
Mainland Europe is 220V, UK 240V, these small differences in voltage and frequency
shouldn't matter at all to a universal switch-mode power supply... It might have been
poorly conditioned power (industrial, agricultural - UPS's are recommended in such harsh
environments.) Or a cheap sub-standard power supply unit (out of spec but holding
out at 110V apparently fine).

Words of wisdom (trying to make peace....)

OP, You weren't trying to use it on Euro-Rail, were you? I have several appliances that (almost) regularly blow fuses when plugged in on the rail. They seem to work fine in residential supply, or set to 115Vac here in the States.