Are inductors useful with Arduino?

I got my first arduino about a year or so ago. I often make beginner/intermediate projects with my arduino. I have a lot of components, however I do not have inductors. Would it be useful to buy them so I could use them with my arduino?

Hi. You can create a source or something that filters energy is important to use. But what kind of project do you develop?

MarioIsRed: I got my first arduino about a year or so ago. I often make beginner/intermediate projects with my arduino. I have a lot of components, however I do not have inductors. Would it be useful to buy them so I could use them with my arduino?

I can't think of a reason. If you haven't needed one in a year, then you don't have a reason, either. And, you can easily make an inductor if you ever need one.

Paul

Thank you for your reply. Yes, I know you can make inductors easily with magnet wire and a ferromagnetic core.

Buy inductors or any other component when you need them and always buy a few more than you need to build up stock.

I usually make projects involving sensors, shift registers, leds, ETC. I do not make filters often however, so I now believe it is not necessary to get an inductor. Thank you for your reply!

Develop a boost converter with an inductor to drive an exotic display, for example a Vacuum fluorescent display or a nixie tube.

They are rarely needed in the types of projects that hobbyists make. Sometimes they're useful for filtering, but I've only ever used one when a client wanted to follow the recommended design to the letter, including the ferrite bead inductor between Vcc and AVcc (which hardly anyone does, because the ADC accuracy is fine under typical conditions without it)

I've used them a few times for making my own dc-dc converter circuits (for my attiny43 breakout board - that part has an integrated boost converter to run off a single alkaline battery, just add external diode, caps, and inductor - and when I needed multiple converters with very specific capabilities integrated onto a single board) - but those are a somewhat advanced circuit, as you typically need a custom circuit board for them (they're extremely layout sensitive), and for typical applications, low cost modules can be had on ebay from china for dirt cheap. I also used them when, as a largely academic exercise, I built my own OOK 433mhz transmitter and receiver with the synoxo chips, which require a few external inductors in the matching network (also not generally relevant to hobby work, as excellent receivers like the RXB-12 and RXB-14 are like $1/ea, transmitters for even less, and transmitters + crappy transceivers are under $1/pair - prices at which mere mortals like us couldn't even score the parts for them) - as it happens these are also layout sensitive.

I use them all the time whenever I have a project involving motors, like the recent motorised fader project, or a MIDI beater to control the hitting of stuff from a sequencer using servo motors.

They soak up the interference and stop the Arduino going crazy. The last circuit on this page http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/De-coupling.html

My go-to jellybean inductor is the BLM21PG331 datasheet

I only use it when I need to take critical analog measurements nearby a radio transmitter which transmits on 100MHz or near that frequency.

Inductors are extremely useful in switchmode power supplies. But you need very specific values to meet the performance requirements for a particular design. You don't keep a hundred of one standard value in stock.

You would often see large inductors used in HiFi speaker crossovers. Once again, specific values are needed and they are usually too big to keep a hundred in stock.

I normally add Pi filters to the Arduino branch of the power supply when there’s a lot of interference expected elsewhere, such as motors or a long string of WS2812 LEDs. Keeps the noise out. It’s really interesting to connect a scope to the different parts of such a circuit, it may even matter a lot on which end of the bread board power supply rail you’re looking.

The NME0505SC isolated DC/DC converter also recommends an inductor on the output as additional filter. Again, power supply filtering.

I’ve also used them when playing with LC oscillators for a Theremin-inspired project.

Other than that… never had a need for them.

Since you show an interest I would suggest buying scavenging a small assortment. Try to make a few as well. By experimenting with them you will begin to understand them and what useful and or destructive devices they are. If you can get a scope that would be an invaluable aid, you can even make one from your sound card. There are a lot of DIY information on them. This response is to help you get started in solving your problem, not solve it for you. Good Luck & Have Fun! Gil

6v6gt: Develop a boost converter with an inductor to drive an exotic display, for example a Vacuum fluorescent display or a nixie tube.

... or the plate supply for a 6V6 tube (valve for you Brits). :)