Are there any smaller H-Bridges that I can use with my two motors?

Hello! I'm trying to get two separate 12V DC motors to run at separate times when they receive a signal from two separate ultrasonic sensors. Can I use 1 H-Bridge with my Arduino and control them both at separate times, or is it possible to run two smaller H-bridges? (One with each motor to save space?)

I'm new to H-bridges and trying to teach myself how a lot of this works. The H-Bridge I found here looks like an entire Arduino Unit, but I'm supposed to connect it to my Arduino Uno? It seems kind of large. :D Any help is appreciated! Thank you!

Here is the H-Bridge I'm looking at:

http://www.adafruit.com/products/1438

l298

Each bridge needs inputs for on/off and direction as well as PWM is available. So you can drive multiple bridges. It is up to the programming to determine what happens.

Weedpharma

That Adafruit site lists its advantages against the L298’s smaller brother L293d.
The product also has 2 drivers on board, enabling 2 stepper motors or 4 standard DC motors.
Plus the capability of driving a few extra servos, which makes it a quite interesting shield to use for some robotics projects.
It is controlled by I2C, which saves I/O pins on the Arduino.
The shield also has a nice prototype space to build your own electronics on, visible as the grid of solderpads.

If you’re not using an Uno, or do not want to use shields, then you could look for some other alternatives, there’s a lot of those around.
But you hinted to you’re using an Uno (right ?).
You seem to be unfamiliar with shields.
A shield is an extension to your Arduino, and is extremely easy to connect to the Arduino: simply stack them.
You can stack a number of shields, but before you do you need to check they won’t create conflicts becuase they need the same pins.

An alternative, widely used in 3D printers, is something like this A4988 solution (click !).
It is smaller and doesn’t have the disadvantages of the L293/8 .
You have to decide whether it will be a better solution for your setup.

Ian_McElrath: Hello! I'm trying to get two separate 12V DC motors to run at separate times when they receive a signal from two separate ultrasonic sensors. Can I use 1 H-Bridge with my Arduino and control them both at separate times, or is it possible to run two smaller H-bridges? (One with each motor to save space?)

I'm new to H-bridges and trying to teach myself how a lot of this works. The H-Bridge I found here looks like an entire Arduino Unit, but I'm supposed to connect it to my Arduino Uno? It seems kind of large. :D Any help is appreciated! Thank you!

Here is the H-Bridge I'm looking at:

http://www.adafruit.com/products/1438

You need to tell us the details of the motors, that's the starting point for choosing any H-bridge or driver.

The Texas Instruments sn75441one can control 2 motors up to 36v. It is easy to use and is a 16 pin chip that is very small. It may look complex, but all you need are 4 pins to control it (2 for each motor), and a 5v supply for the chip.

Here is are two good tutorials for it:
https://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/labs/motors-and-transistors/dc-motor-control-using-an-h-bridge/

This is the datasheet:

Good luck!

MarkT:
You need to tell us the details of the motors, that’s the starting point for choosing any H-bridge or driver.

All I know is that each one is 12V and spins at 6200 RPMs. I’m trying to get it to spin as long as an object is within a certain distance of a ultrasonic sensor.

tinkerkid:
The Texas Instruments sn75441one can control 2 motors up to 36v. It is easy to use and is a 16 pin chip that is very small. It may look complex, but all you need are 4 pins to control it (2 for each motor), and a 5v supply for the chip.

Here is are two good tutorials for it:
https://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/labs/motors-and-transistors/dc-motor-control-using-an-h-bridge/

http://www.instructables.com/id/Duel-Motor-Driver-with-Arduino-using-a-SN754410NE-/

This is the datasheet:
http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/sn754410.pdf

Good luck!

Thank you, very much! :slight_smile:

Still no idea how to drive this motor - you need to find out the stall current (or equivalently the winding resistance)

For instance I've a 24V motor that spins at 3600rpm, but that doesn't tell you that its 2kW and can pull >200 amps....

At the very least the size of the motor is useful. Or even torque (torque is related to rotor volume)