Are these two boards functually identical?

They look different, but are they the same technically speaking?

quamikazee:
They look different, but are they the same technically speaking?

I tend to be very cautious with these clone boards.
I have one that is marked Robotale Leonardo, that I would never connect in a circuit.

I know of no definitive arduino sketches that would test a board to determine if it was functional the same as
a known "Good" Arduino board.

Not wanting to release the magic smoke from any electronic components nor boards I tend to be overly
cautious.

8e1b598c183743020c9f198de4f66d764e39c92f.jpg

They are.

The one on the right is more like an original Uno, but it still is a clone at best.
Because it has the Arduino logo on the board, that one is likely to be a counterfeit.

The one on the left has at least the same functionality.
It is a clone and not a counterfeit, because it doesn’t pretend to be an original Uno.
The controller chip on board has more pins, which made it possible to have 2 extra analog inputs available (you can’t use those pins for any other function).
But these pins don’t seem to be made available, so you can’t use them.
The chip is smaller, and so is it’s price.
Also, this board has a CH340 USB to serial chip on board, which means you need to download the correct driver for it before you can use it with the IDE.
Boards like these are often cheaper than a pre-programmed controller to exchange in case you blew up the one on the boards like that on the right side.
So getting a new board would be smarter than changing the controller.

MAS3:
8e1b598c183743020c9f198de4f66d764e39c92f.jpg

They are.

The one on the right is more like an original Uno, but it still is a clone at best.
Because it has the Arduino logo on the board, that one is likely to be a counterfeit.

The one on the left has at least the same functionality.
It is a clone and not a counterfeit, because it doesn’t pretend to be an original Uno.
The controller chip on board has more pins, which made it possible to have 2 extra analog inputs available (you can’t use those pins for any other function).
But these pins don’t seem to be made available, so you can’t use them.
The chip is smaller, and so is it’s price.
Also, this board has a CH340 USB to serial chip on board, which means you need to download the correct driver for it before you can use it with the IDE.
Boards like these are often cheaper than a pre-programmed controller to exchange in case you blew up the one on the boards like that on the right side.
So getting a new board would be smarter than changing the controller.

Going by https://www.arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit , the one on the right is counterfeit given the green voltage regulator. Given that it is a counterfeit board, I personally would never use it. It is tainted goods. The one on the left is clearly a knockoff, no attempt to pass it off as an official Arduino UNO board.
You only have the word of the manufacturer that it is functionally an Arduino UNO board. Is there a way to test if it is? Not for the average hobbyist. Even the hard core hobbyist would be hard pressed to thoroughly test the board. I know I pay more for an Arduino UNO board from the Arduino Store, but I have the perception of it being a “good” board.

I will not purchase anything with doghunter, linino or arduino.org on it. Personal choice. They have caused enough misery for the Arduino Community.

No need to quote the entire message above yours.

It’s a fuse, not a regulator.

It’s fine for you to have your opinion and convey it.
But your opinion is just that, and hardly a sound advice to someone asking for facts.

An Arduino isn’t a lot of hardware, it’s pretty straightforward.
It’s a preprogrammed (bootloader) controller with power supply, and some headers placed in such way (form factor) that you can add shields to it.
It may (depending on model) also have an USB to serial converter on board, and has a few LEDs and accompanying hardware on board.
That’s it.

If you have visited the site that informs about counterfeits, then you will have seen that it is an open hardware project.
People can create their own boards and sell them.
They can even use the exact same PCB layout, but not the Arduino logo and / or trademarks.
So calling these boards a knockoff, is just venting an opinion.
The picture on the left is not a copy, because it uses other, cheaper hardware for the controller and the USB / serial converter.

Of course there will be good and lesser boards offered.
Quality might differ between different production runs or brands.
But you will not be able to tell that from some photograph form a site selling the products.

Fact is, that if you buy an original, through official channels (or else you might end up with a counterfeit after all), you pay an extra to support this here community.
So if you do like Arduino and the community, buy a few official products, or donate to keep things going.
And be an active member of the community.

Having had both clones and real ones for a while I can honestly say that the quality of many clones has come a long way.

Especially with the simpler boards such as the UNO.
Clones are much more voltage tolerant than the real thing.

As for the driver issue thats only for the desktop IDE as CREATE has those drivers right out of the box.

Not yet had a "bad" clone but cant say the same for original boards.
I have a YUN that has had a flaky USB connector from the start.
Last MKR zero to arrive had this thin nasty header pins.
My 101 wanders around com ports upsetting other devices just for fun.

The Chinese seem to have caught onto the fact that they dont need to counterfeit any more.

Would I be without my dodgy REAL boards ? Nope despite the warts they are the real thing.
Would I be without my clones ? NOPE they are the cheap workhorses I can abuse and replace if I need.

Its what fits the money belt and if you cannot afford real ones, clones will get you into the game until you can.