assign MKR1000 w/ETH multiple IP Addresses?

So here's my logic, with windows I can go into my network adapters and assign multiple IP Address's to a single ethernet port.

Is there a way for me to do that with an Arduino device? The reason why I'm asking is the following.

I have a project that I'm working on that has me setting up a local network of components. There are 5 different pieces that I want communicating with each other. One of these devices is an Arduino mkr1000 with the ETH hat. I currently have everything communicating with 192.168.. I can connect my laptop and it talks just fine with all the devices.

These 5 components will make up an individual cluster, I will then be attaching multiple clusters to a wider network. This wider network is setup as 10.8... I've done this as I do not want all of the components of the each cluster being able to talk with each other, as some of the components are using the same static IP address. I can not assign separate Static IP's to all of the individual components. The software for most of the components is designed to be used within the clusters.

The rub of it is, I'm finding a new issue with very limited specific information will need to be shared among the clusters. Things like time stamps to keep the cluster's synced. The Arduino devices are currently configured with a 192.168.. static ip to talk within the an individual cluster. Can I set up another socket with a different IP address that I can use to send out small packets to the wider area network?

Is there a way for me to do that with an Arduino device?

No.

The rub of it is, I’m finding a new issue with very limited specific information will need to be shared among the clusters. Things like time stamps to keep the cluster’s synced. The Arduino devices are currently configured with a 192.168.. static ip to talk within the an individual cluster. Can I set up another socket with a different IP address that I can use to send out small packets to the wider area network?

If you designed your network correctly, this isn’t necessary as the router will send the traffic to the correct recipient (and the opposite way).

I might have misunderstood your setup but why don’t you give 10.8.. addresses to all of your devices? Then they are all in the same network and don’t need a router. If you need the networks separated for some reason you should put routers between the networks which handles the traffic.

Shannon,

Hello, Thanks for the support.

Yea I would love to have everything on the same network, but each cluster needs to communicate within its own assortment of devices. Each cluster will be an exact replicate of the previous cluster. Each device within one cluster will have the same IP address as the device in the next cluster. I wanted to introduce the Arduino as a singular device that would be able to communicate on both networks. This way it would be able to relay information from within a cluster on to the next cluster.

I'm thinking I will need to introduce an SBC rather than the Arduino.

Each device within one cluster will have the same IP address as the device in the next cluster.

A very bad design! You did the architecture wrong, so don't expect your hardware/software to fix it.

I'm thinking I will need to introduce an SBC rather than the Arduino.

But you need one with a full-fledged OS on it (p.e. some Linux board as a Raspberry Pi or similar). BTW, the Arduino is also an SBC (Single Board Computer).

Haha, yea, I understand that Arduino is a SBC. I meant to imply a device like a Beaglebone, Upboard, or PI that has a full OS.

I can see how you might feel that this is a bad design. Generally speaking, yes I agree, each device should have its on IP Address associated with it. However, its about being able to scale easily. If I can add a new cluster and only have to be concerned about making one single device within each cluster have a unique IP, I can add clusters easily. Each cluster has 10 devices, not including the SBC, that I would need to track the IP, update the software or config file for that cluster. This way everything runs at it should within an individual cluster, and only a single device requires a unique IP.

If you think about it, the devices in your home could have the exact same IP addresses that I'm using at my house. My home is a cluster and yours is another cluster.

I know its not the exact same thing, but its similar in the context that I'm working with.

I know its not the exact same thing, but its similar in the context that I'm working with.

That device in your "cluster" that has two IPs is usually called a router because it forwards packets from the internal network to the WAN/public network/internet or how you like to call it. An IoT device usually doesn't offer router functionality but full-fledged OSes do offer that service.