Atmega328p standalone, dead or alive?

Hello,
Today I had a short circuit on my bradboard and for a brief period (less than half second) there was 12V applied to the Vcc terminals of the standalone atmega328p.
It look dead, so I assembled the "ArduinoToBreadboard" (https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ArduinoToBreadboard) circuit to try to burn the bootloader again to see if I could save it, I got this report:

avrdude: Version 6.3, compiled on Jan 17 2017 at 12:00:53
         Copyright (c) 2000-2005 Brian Dean, http://www.bdmicro.com/
         Copyright (c) 2007-2014 Joerg Wunsch

         System wide configuration file is "C:\Users\Lucas\AppData\Local\Arduino15\packages\arduino\tools\avrdude\6.3.0-arduino9/etc/avrdude.conf"

         Using Port                    : COM3
         Using Programmer              : stk500v1
         Overriding Baud Rate          : 19200
         AVR Part                      : ATmega328P
         Chip Erase delay              : 9000 us
         PAGEL                         : PD7
         BS2                           : PC2
         RESET disposition             : dedicated
         RETRY pulse                   : SCK
         serial program mode           : yes
         parallel program mode         : yes
         Timeout                       : 200
         StabDelay                     : 100
         CmdexeDelay                   : 25
         SyncLoops                     : 32
         ByteDelay                     : 0
         PollIndex                     : 3
         PollValue                     : 0x53
         Memory Detail                 :

                                  Block Poll               Page                       Polled
           Memory Type Mode Delay Size  Indx Paged  Size   Size #Pages MinW  MaxW   ReadBack
           ----------- ---- ----- ----- ---- ------ ------ ---- ------ ----- ----- ---------
           eeprom        65    20     4    0 no       1024    4      0  3600  3600 0xff 0xff
           flash         65     6   128    0 yes     32768  128    256  4500  4500 0xff 0xff
           lfuse          0     0     0    0 no          1    0      0  4500  4500 0x00 0x00
           hfuse          0     0     0    0 no          1    0      0  4500  4500 0x00 0x00
           efuse          0     0     0    0 no          1    0      0  4500  4500 0x00 0x00
           lock           0     0     0    0 no          1    0      0  4500  4500 0x00 0x00
           calibration    0     0     0    0 no          1    0      0     0     0 0x00 0x00
           signature      0     0     0    0 no          3    0      0     0     0 0x00 0x00

         Programmer Type : STK500
         Description     : Atmel STK500 Version 1.x firmware
         Hardware Version: 2
         Firmware Version: 1.18
         Topcard         : Unknown
         Vtarget         : 0.0 V
         Varef           : 0.0 V
         Oscillator      : Off
         SCK period      : 0.1 us

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.02s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x000000 (retrying)

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.02s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x000000 (retrying)

Error quemando bootloader
Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.02s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x000000
avrdude: Yikes!  Invalid device signature.
         Double check connections and try again, or use -F to override
         this check.


avrdude done.  Thank you.

This Atmega328p is officially dead or there is a way I could save it?

12v to Vcc (i.e. 5v) say goodbye to the Arduino.

Is there a crystal on it? 0x000000 sig can happen if it was bootloader to use a crystal, but one isn't present.

But yeah, applying 12v to vcc, even for a half second, probably killed it. Dont waste much time investigating (I keep a bin of presumed dead electronics, and occasionally realize I was doing something wrong and dig through it. Plus a bin of "ffs, you still dont have a goddamned hot air rework station?!" boards)

Of course, I mounted the circuit of the "ArduinoToBreadboard" tutorial, with the 16Mhz crystal.
Okey then, I will start to fill my "blow up electronics box" haha

I would like to know in wich cases a high voltage programmer could save a microcontroller, I think it could only solve a mistaken fuse problem, but i'm not shure..

HVSP can revive a chip that has fuses programmed to disable reset or SPI programming, or to use a clock source that you can't provide or which you can't program it in.

Oh - and the ArduinoToBreadboard tutorial omits the two 0.1uF ceramic decoupling caps needed between Vcc and Gnd and AVcc and Gnd, right next to the chip. Without these, the chip may behave erratically (random resets, hangs, etc).

HVSP can revive a chip that has fuses programmed to disable reset or SPI programming, or to use a clock source that you can’t provide or which you can’t program it in.

That’s what I thought, so a high voltage programmer won’t revive a “more than 5.5V supplied” atmega328

Oh - and the ArduinoToBreadboard tutorial omits the two 0.1uF ceramic decoupling caps needed between Vcc and Gnd and AVcc and Gnd, right next to the chip. Without these, the chip may behave erratically (random resets, hangs, etc).

Good thing to know, thank you DrAzzy

As far as I understand a HVSP works by applying 12V to the RESET pin in a very controlled way, so the mcu can start ignoring (or reseting) some fuses. Unless the 12V to vcc only trashed the fuses (is that even possible ?) I don't think a HVSP can save the day here.

I'm still have to bought a HVSP, but so far I wasn't able to find one that's not over 50 USD.

ocsav:
. . .
I'm still have to [buy] a HVSP, but so far I wasn't able to find one that's not over 50 USD.

Here is one: https://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=12898

The AVR Dragon is $49.00 US. In addition to HVPP, it also supports debugging of AVR chips in Atmel Studio.