Atmel 328 chip dead?

Hi all!

I'm working on a project using the Atmel 328 the same as the Arduino UNO. I started with a prototype on an arduino - liked it - then decided to take it to a custom PC board with a 328P-PU and eliminate the extra components (USB, power jack, etc.) and then program using Atmel Studio 6.0 and an mkII tool....don't want to feel guilty if I sell these things.

I bought all new components, made the board, put it together and couldn't get the tool to even recognize the chip...assumed bad wiring..traced and verified all good...resorted to prying the chip out of my arduino and putting my new chip in it's place...nothing..put my Arduino in my custom board (livin on the edge) and wa la ... it works?!?!

My questions...Did I get a dead chip from Digikey or am I missing something? This is my first project with a micro controller so I'm new at this...is there a trick to initializing a new controller? Seems to me there were two chips available, one with the Arduino bootloader preloaded...should I have bought the other chip?

PJP

did you set the fuses?

(and you should not feel bad about selling it using arduino software, though if you look at the license you may have to meet requirements)

Can't even get the chip to ID using the mkII tool. Have to get past that step to set fuses I think...unless there is another way in?

The arduino UNO chip works when placed in my board or in the original UNO board - I can see it's fuse settings.
The new chip doesn't work in either- not even a chip ID

What are the odds that the first chip I get is a dud?

rvflier:
What are the odds that the first chip I get is a dud?

Exceedingly unlikely, but your description has me scratching my head. From the factory, the chip is set to run from the internal 8MHz RC oscillator divided by 8, so a clock frequency of 1MHz. If an external crystal or resonator is connected, it will not be used to supply the system clock until the fuse bytes are modified appropriately. A valid clock is needed for ICSP programming (e.g. with the AVRISPMKII), which is why the default fuse settings are what they are. Allows the chip to be programmed in pretty much any situation.

You can try installing a bootloader on the new chip to see if that corrects the problem. This is one way to set fuses and see if the chip is still good.

I’ve bought lots of chips from Digikey with no issues.

Can you bootload the chip in your Uno board with the MKii?

Might have to install drivers for Tools: Burn Bootloader to work.
This is my path to the drivers.

Thanks for the info.

I ordered a couple more chips last night...realized as I was ordering that it probably wasn't Digikey I got the original from, also don't want anyone to think they did anything to cause my issue - always have great service from them.

The chip that came with the Arduino UNO that I used works in all cases. Just to give more detail on my steps of troubleshooting:

-Assembled custom PC board with new Atmel Atmega328P-PU chip, 16Mhz resonator (same brand as UNO but a through hole package)
-Powered board and plugged in mkII tool, red light on tool, can read voltage but no chip ID
-Unplugged tool from custom board and plugged into Arduino UNO, green light
-Opened connection to the Arduino in Atmel Studio 6 and read the voltage and chip ID from arduino
-Removed purchased 328 from custom board and inserted it into Arduino board, red light on tool and no chip ID
-Inserted Arduino 328 into custom board and plugged in tool, green light on tool and can read voltage and chip ID

I'll check my vendor and part number, I think I may have bought the chip that had a bootloader on it...has a blue sticker stuck to it.

Pat

rvflier:
I'll check my vendor and part number, I think I may have bought the chip that had a bootloader on it...has a blue sticker stuck to it.

Bootloader should not have mattered at all to an ICSP programmer. Should still be able to read fuses, signature bytes, etc. I've bought a lot of MCUs, 328s and others, many from Mouser, a few from Digikey and a few from other sources. Never a bad one and never any stickers on them, but I've never bought one with a bootloader already installed, I suppose the sticker could be to identify that.

Good luck, let us know the outcome of this mystery!

"-Powered board and plugged in mkII tool, red light on tool, can read voltage but no chip ID"

The MKii does not provide power - it only monitors the +5V pin and sets its levels accordingly. You must have power supplied elsewhere.

The custom board has a 5VDC supply. I get the power feedback "5.1V" from the tool so I assume it's able to detect and measure the board voltage.

If it can detect & measure the board voltage, then why the red light?
Is the 2x3 header being plugged on backwards? Or maybe the custom board pinout is not correct?

I thought that too so i tried the other chip in the custom board and it works.

My guess is I got the one bad chip in the batch...played about 6 raffles at the banquet Friday and didn't win a thing. Come home to pick the one in a million chip.