Automatic Mixer for my Marine Reef

Hello Guys,

I am a medical doctor and unfortunately I just understand a little bit things of electronics. So, I have a marine reef and I am trying to build some kind of a automatic mixer for my reef as in this link:

I have been reading a lot of posts in internet include here in the Arduino forum, but I am with serious doubts about it.

I would like to know if is possible to get some help from you guys here about my project?

I already bought the following devices for my project:

Arduino Uno R3
Nema Motor 34 10nm
Driver motor - HY-DIV268N-5A
Power supply 42v 4 amp

I already started the physical connection between the Nema motor and the driver as following:

In the Nema motor I have 8 wires - Yellow, blue, brown, orange, green, white, red and black. The orange I connected in the brown and insulated with electrical tape. Did the same with the yellow and blue wires. The red wire I connected in the A+ on the motor driver. The black in the A-. The white in the B+ and the green in the B-.

Am I right until here?

Many thanks for all!!!!

Daniel

My data sheet says black=A (A+), orange /A (A-), red B (B+) and yellow /B (B-), nothing about the other colours (maybe sensors?)

Why did you connect lines together? Following which instructions or data sheet?

Daniel_Almeida_Prado:
Nema Motor 34 10nm
Driver motor - HY-DIV268N-5A

Why do you want to use a stepper motor?

Is it essential to be able to control the rotation up to 1/1000 rotation of your mixer?

In the video it looks as if the application is: Stir contents some seconds left, stir contents some seconds right, and it would not matter at all if it is one rotation more or less. I'd use simple DC motors in such an application, not stepper motors.

The stepper shown on the video and typically used in these applications has a gearbox.

the reason a stepper is the preferred motor is that torque is highest at low speed and on a DC motor, the torque is not available until it reaches higher speeds.

Welcome to the wonderful world of Arduinos !

the proper way to attack such a problem is to create three drawings.

one is your logic drawing that show the sequence things happen. from this you write your code, or in he Arduino world, we call it a sketch.

two is the connection of mechanical bits. motors, valves, something that approximates the physical layout of your project.

the third is your wiring diagram, or schematic. use a pencil, get ready to do it over and over.
we would like to see the schematic. this helps us help you.

as you have probably figured out, the stepper power has to be dedicated to the stepper and be of high amps.
the power for the Arduino is separate so that the power the motor uses does not effect the logic of the Arduino.

looks like are off to a good start.

stepper motor basics.

make sure NONE of the wires are touching each other. EVER.

that is worth repeating.
make sure NONE of the wires are touching each other. EVER.
no little strands as thick as a human hair.....

now for the only exception: bench testing.
take any two wires that you think are on the same coil and hold them together.
try to spin the motor by hand.
release the wires.
spin again.
was it locked up when the wires were touching ?

when you connect any two ends of a coil on a stepper, it acts like a brake.
this is your test to make sure the wires are the right ones.
it also shows that you have to be very careful to make sure you do not let un-used wires touch, EVER
And make sure any strands of any wires at the driver, never touch each other. EVER

an 8 wire stepper has 4 separate coils.
you have three basic choices.

use 2 coils, abandon 2 coils (this is what you are doing. will work well)

connect matched coils and connect them in the correct orientation so you treat the 4 coils like 2 coils. this is called parallel wiring of coils.

or connect one end of the matched coils to the correct other end of the other matched coil to create one double length coil. this is called series wiring. it leaves you with 4 wires for the motor. this makes this a 4 wire motor. but the calculations for use are completely different.

based on your first attempts, use 2, abandon 2. but make sure that each end is sealed/taped off, so that it cannot touch anything or any other wires.

DrDiettrich:
My data sheet says black=A (A+), orange /A (A-), red B (B+) and yellow /B (B-), nothing about the other colours (maybe sensors?)

Why did you connect lines together? Following which instructions or data sheet?

Hello DrDiettrich,

Many thanks for your help.

I followed exactly as the datasheet of my motor and I choose to do an electrical wiring in series. I do not know whats the purpose of the other colors, but as I said I followed the datasheet.

Daniel

jurs:
Why do you want to use a stepper motor?

Is it essential to be able to control the rotation up to 1/1000 rotation of your mixer?

In the video it looks as if the application is: Stir contents some seconds left, stir contents some seconds right, and it would not matter at all if it is one rotation more or less. I'd use simple DC motors in such an application, not stepper motors.

Hello Jurs,

Thank you very much for your help.

I preferred to use a stepper motor and not a DC motor exactly by the reason of dave-in-nj answered. Stepper motors has a bigger torque in low speeds than DC motors.

Daniel

dave-in-nj:
Welcome to the wonderful world of Arduinos !

the proper way to attack such a problem is to create three drawings.

one is your logic drawing that show the sequence things happen. from this you write your code, or in he Arduino world, we call it a sketch.

two is the connection of mechanical bits. motors, valves, something that approximates the physical layout of your project.

the third is your wiring diagram, or schematic. use a pencil, get ready to do it over and over.
we would like to see the schematic. this helps us help you.

as you have probably figured out, the stepper power has to be dedicated to the stepper and be of high amps.
the power for the Arduino is separate so that the power the motor uses does not effect the logic of the Arduino.

looks like are off to a good start.

Hello dave-in-nj,

Many thanks for your attention and help!!!!

As a medical doctor the way of my thinking is a bit difference from you guys that understand a lot of electronics. So, yours first explanations help me a lot in how to think in electronics issues. Thank you very much in this.

I will draw the 3 steps and post later. This will really help me and you guys in help me on this project.

Daniel

dave-in-nj:
stepper motor basics.

make sure NONE of the wires are touching each other. EVER.

I didn't know that, but thank you for the advice. In any way I've never left the wires touching each other. However, why?

dave-in-nj:
now for the only exception: bench testing.
take any two wires that you think are on the same coil and hold them together.
try to spin the motor by hand.
release the wires.
spin again.
was it locked up when the wires were touching ?

when you connect any two ends of a coil on a stepper, it acts like a brake.
this is your test to make sure the wires are the right ones.

If I understand after these tests if the wires are the right ones will be possible to spin the motor by hand? If the wires are wrong I will cannot spin the motor by hand because it will act like a brake. Am I right?

dave-in-nj:
an 8 wire stepper has 4 separate coils.
you have three basic choices.

use 2 coils, abandon 2 coils (this is what you are doing. will work well)

I prefer to use the series wiring just for motor safety reasons. The stepper will work with more safety/security level of tension. Should I keeping going with this wiring?

Daniel

Daniel_Almeida_Prado:
I preferred to use a stepper motor and not a DC motor exactly by the reason of dave-in-nj answered. Stepper motors has a bigger torque in low speeds than DC motors.

DC motors are usually used as "gear motor" with a gear that slows down rotation and increases torque. For quiete operation possibly with a "planetary gear". But do as you like. Of course also stepper motors can turn things round and the other way round.

Daniel_Almeida_Prado:
I didn't know that, but thank you for the advice. In any way I've never left the wires touching each other. However, why?

I prefer to use the series wiring just for motor safety reasons. The stepper will work with more safety/security level of tension. Should I keeping going with this wiring?

Daniel

yes. wire it the way are comfortable.
you can wire any of the three ways.
parallel and series are a bit harder to wire, but once you have it right, things work great.
Remember to set the drive current to exactly half of the motor’s rated parallel current rating when using the series connection

motor wring is about half way down the page on this link.

Daniel_Almeida_Prado:
I didn't know that, but thank you for the advice. In any way I've never left the wires touching each other. However, why?

if you use a 8 or 6 wire stepper and do not use all the wires, any stray wire could short out things and burn out the driver.
any coil that is shorted, acts like a brake. that means the motor would not work properly or as expected.
I was un-sure of your wording before. thought you said you tied all the loose wires together.....

Finding pairs with a multimeter (or Ohm meter) is much easier than by hand , you just test wires 2 by 2 and see which 2 pairs (4 wires) have same resistance (like , 1A and 1B are 10 ohms and 2A and 2B are 10 ohms so 1A and 1B are pairs and 2A and 2B are other pairs) . if you're using your stepper as a bipolar (4 wired) (the somehow better way) you should leave the other wires untouched but in unipolar you need the other ones too . 8 wire is unipolar but you could test to see if it works as bipolar but smoke coming from the motor is a sign that it cant be used with 4 wires .

jurs:
DC motors are usually used as "gear motor" with a gear that slows down rotation and increases torque. For quiete operation possibly with a "planetary gear". But do as you like. Of course also stepper motors can turn things round and the other way round.

Many thanks for the explanation Jurs!!!!!!

dave-in-nj:
yes. wire it the way are comfortable.
you can wire any of the three ways.
parallel and series are a bit harder to wire, but once you have it right, things work great.
Remember to set the drive current to exactly half of the motor’s rated parallel current rating when using the series connection
Support for Troubleshooting Servo & Stepper Motor Controls | Geckodrive
motor wring is about half way down the page on this link.

Hello dave-in-nj,

Many thanks for the advice!!!!

Arman5592:
Finding pairs with a multimeter (or Ohm meter) is much easier than by hand , you just test wires 2 by 2 and see which 2 pairs (4 wires) have same resistance (like , 1A and 1B are 10 ohms and 2A and 2B are 10 ohms so 1A and 1B are pairs and 2A and 2B are other pairs) . if you're using your stepper as a bipolar (4 wired) (the somehow better way) you should leave the other wires untouched but in unipolar you need the other ones too . 8 wire is unipolar but you could test to see if it works as bipolar but smoke coming from the motor is a sign that it cant be used with 4 wires .

Hello Arman 5592,

Many thanks for the help!!!!

Dave-in-nj,

I did the drawing as you made a mention!!!

Am I right?

Rgds

Daniel

My doubt now is if I did correct connections mainly between the Driver and the Arduino. My connections is right?

Rgds

Daniel

Daniel_Almeida_Prado:
My doubt now is if I did correct connections mainly between the Driver and the Arduino. My connections is right?

Rgds

Daniel

I do not remember seeing a link to the data sheet for the motor.
can you post either a link to the data sheet or the data sheet ?
there are no rules on colors. you must read the data sheet and test.
make sure there is infinity between the A and B phases
and that both phases ohm out about the same.