Backside of Arduino

Hi Everyone! I have a quick question for you guys concerning the backside of the Arduino.

The backside of the Arduino has metallic outcroppings where the pins and other things are placed in the board. Are these metallic outcroppings related to the functionality of their associated pin? I believe the answer to this question is YES. If the answer is indeed YES, then wouldn't it be necessary to insulate these backside metallic outcroppings?

I believe the answer to the question is YES due to a simple test. If you touch the metallic outcroppings that are aligned with an analog pin when you are calling the analogRead of that function, it will result in a 0 or a 1023.

So, does anyone else insulate the backside of the Arduino?

And, what is the function of these backside metallic outcroppings? What are they used for, what are they related to? How do I insulate them?

VaporDoughnut: Hi Everyone! I have a quick question for you guys concerning the backside of the Arduino.

The backside of the Arduino has metallic outcroppings where the pins and other things are placed in the board. Are these metallic outcroppings related to the functionality of their associated pin? I believe the answer to this question is YES. If the answer is indeed YES, then wouldn't it be necessary to insulate these backside metallic outcroppings?

The answer is Yes, and placing an arduino board onto any kind of conductive surface is a good way to send the board off to arduino heaven.

I believe the answer to the question is YES due to a simple test. If you touch the metallic outcroppings that are aligned with an analog pin when you are calling the analogRead of that function, it will result in a 0 or a 1023.

So, does anyone else insulate the backside of the Arduino?

I use 3mm nylon screws about an inch long with nylon nuts mounted in the board holes to act like stand-off legs. Keeps the board from shorting on conductive surfaces and prevents scratching on non-conductive surfaces. If you have a board with only three mounting holes you can just epoxy a sanded flat screw head to make the fourth leg if you wish, but even with just three legs if tipped won't short anything out.

Lefty

Wow. Awesome response, thank you Lefty!

I was always just putting the Arduino on the table and never even knew about the properties of the backside... They should mention those properties to people who are new to the board... I think I am going to insulate it simply using Saran Wrap.

What is the purpose of the backside, anyways?

The backside of the board is used to run traces or thin connection wires. most of said wires should be coated in a resin or epoxy, but the few parts that are "through-hole" have conductive leads that poke through holes in the circuit board and are soldered on the backside.

VaporDoughnut: Wow. Awesome response, thank you Lefty!

I was always just putting the Arduino on the table and never even knew about the properties of the backside... They should mention those properties to people who are new to the board... I think I am going to insulate it simply using Saran Wrap.

What is the purpose of the backside, anyways?

Saran wrap sounds like a bad idea, it's not very resistant to the sharp points of the soldered connections and will tear easily as the board is moved around connecting and un-connecting stuff, you need something tougher. Maybe some rubber sheet with a sticky side? I like the screw legs, but find something that works for you.

Lefty

VaporDoughnut: Wow. Awesome response, thank you Lefty!

I was always just putting the Arduino on the table and never even knew about the properties of the backside... They should mention those properties to people who are new to the board... I think I am going to insulate it simply using Saran Wrap.

What is the purpose of the backside, anyways?

If the backside weren't there, then the Arduino would have to be assembled on a Möbius strip, which greatly increases production costs ;) (Sorry about that, couldn't resist.)

I'd try electrical tape instead of Saran. That stuff is really thin and it wouldn't take much for the pins and such on the backside to poke through, they are often quite sharp. Get the good stuff -- 3M brand is my fave. Scotch 33 for general purpose but I also keep a roll of Scotch 88 around because it is thicker.

Lefty's idea is good, you can also mount it to a piece of wood, and I have also tried these and these and like them. Having the breadboard is a good combination, but there again, that could be arranged with small piece of plywood, 1x4, etc.

Welcome to the forum, hope you have a blast with Arduino!

You should also beware of the ICSP header on some flavours of Arduino such as the Nano see the photo here: http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardNano If you aren't using the header, wrap some electrical tape around it so that you can't accidentally short something out.

Pete

Please do not wrap your Arduino board in saran-wrap. The stuff that makes Saran-wrap cling to itself is static electricity, and static electricity KILLS arduino boards! - So be very carefull. If you don't have foil-bags to keep your Arduino boards and sensitive electronics in, you can wrap it in paper (newspaper etc) as it's static safe.

// Per.

There was a kickstarter project called "Fruitstand" that looked like it was going to be absolutely ideal for this. It didn't get the funding though. Maybe the developer of it still wants to go ahead, and with enough encouragement may start the project up again?

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2056325024/fruitstand-give-raspberry-pi-and-arduino-a-place-t

I ended up insulating the backside with scotch tape. This will suit my needs at the moment... I am relatively new to the Arduino, I have done some experiments with it. I also wonder how all of my data has been skewed by the conductive leaking on the backside of the Arduino Uno... It's a great and wonderful tool!

VaporDoughnut: I ended up insulating the backside with scotch tape.

Hardly better than Saran wrap.

I also wonder how all of my data has been skewed by the conductive leaking on the backside of the Arduino Uno...

??? (any bits fall onto the floor?)

It's a great and wonderful tool!

Yes indeed! :D

VaporDoughnut: I also wonder how all of my data has been skewed by the conductive leaking on the backside of the Arduino Uno...

Conductive leaking? Were you placing the Arduino on a metal table?

You're assigning magic powers to the backside of a PCB that simply don't exist.

VaporDoughnut: Wow. Awesome response, thank you Lefty!

I was always just putting the Arduino on the table and never even knew about the properties of the backside...

Google for "arduino case"..."arduino box"

Amazom (among MANY) sells a case that will fit either an Uno Or a Mega.. Comes in smoke and clear among others as I remember.. I bought one although kind of pricey (@ $12.95). I Really like the one I bought, It's saved an Uno of mine on several occasions.

Bob

I use this to hold my Arduino Mega and my Seedunio Mega http://www.ponoko.com/design-your-own/products/arduino-mega-mount-5044

They also make a couple for the Uno http://www.ponoko.com/design-your-own/products/arduino-mount-large--4878 http://www.ponoko.com/design-your-own/products/arduino-mount-standard--4853

You can also buy little adhesive bumpers that are made for drawers at hardware stores, and you just glue 4 of them on the bottom side of the Arduino. I picked up the following at my local Ace Hardware store: http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3674937

Sparkfun and Adafruit also sell similar bumpers if you were already doing an order, and combined the bumpers along with the other goodies.