Battery powered Arduino with NRF24L01 +PA + LNA

Hi, I´am thinking about some kind of battery powered arduino, that can transmit data wirelessly and can work long time ( like one year or so ) without changing the battery. As battery I would like to use some 18650 type. But my biggest problem is voltage conversion. I would like to use Arduino pro Mini (3.3V 8MHz version) and NRF24L01 that is also working on 3.3V . Let´s say that fully charged battery has 4.2V.

Solution #1 : I will use some linear regulator like HT7333
Solution #2 : I will use some step-down regulator

Both solutions seems to me like I am wasting too much power (because the regulators will run even if the MCU is in sleep mode.

Of course I will disable all the leds and other accessories to save power.

Also, there was an idea to wake up Arduino via some kind of external timer that consumes tiny current.

Do you have any ideas how I can solve this problem and run the arduino from battery for long time ?

Hi,

Some good ideas from Nick here: Gammon Forum : Electronics : Microprocessors : Power saving techniques for microprocessors

Hi, yes I´ve already read that article, but there is no info how to power the MCU. Only the steps to lower the power consumption of the chip by lowering the frequency and disabling some of its peripherals.

Dave814:
Hi, I´am thinking about some kind of battery powered arduino, that can transmit data wirelessly and can work long time ( like one year or so ) without changing the battery. As battery I would like to use some 18650 type. But my biggest problem is voltage conversion. I would like to use Arduino pro Mini (3.3V 8MHz version) and NRF24L01 that is also working on 3.3V . Let´s say that fully charged battery has 4.2V.

Solution #1 : I will use some linear regulator like HT7333
Solution #2 : I will use some step-down regulator

Both solutions seems to me like I am wasting too much power (because the regulators will run even if the MCU is in sleep mode.

Of course I will disable all the leds and other accessories to save power.

Also, there was an idea to wake up Arduino via some kind of external timer that consumes tiny current.

Do you have any ideas how I can solve this problem and run the arduino from battery for long time ?

what is the environment that the long term arduino will be exposed to?
Hot, Cold, Indoor, Outdoor, Protected Outdoor?

Nearly all batteries will have reduced voltage when exposed to cold.

I have several wildlife cameras around my property.
for the cameras the long term solution I have found is solar panels.
The solar panels provide more than enough power to keep the camera powered but to keep the electronics from freezing. I do not attempt to keep batteries charged…

Before the solar panels, I was using 12volt lead-acid motorcycle batteries to power the cameras.

12V lead-acid batterry will be a big overshoot in my case :D, and I cannot use solar panels as the device will be outside (Temperature will be always above zero) , but there will not be any sun as it will be underground (sort of). I want to monitor the home sewage water treatment (if it is running, in which phase of cycle it is, and so on... Yes there is electricity but I want it working on battery, and use this solution in other wireless projects)

Dave814:
12V lead-acid batterry will be a big overshoot in my case :D, and I cannot use solar panels as the device will be outside (Temperature will be always above zero) , but there will not be any sun as it will be underground (sort of). I want to monitor the home sewage water treatment (if it is running, in which phase of cycle it is, and so on... Yes there is electricity but I want it working on battery, and use this solution in other wireless projects)

Is it possible to mount solar panels above ground and route the wires/cables to the Arduino below ground?

Yes it is possible, but as I´ve said, if I would want I can connect it to electricity as there is a plug. But I want a solution for batteries. Or some way of not wasting so much energy on regulators. I´ve once saw a small timer-like chip that once in a time powered on the arduino. It has a clock and a mosfet that turn on power to regulator and thus the arduino.

The biggest power consumer will be the NRF24l01, so you need to know how often it will be transmitting to get an estimate of the size of battery that will be needed.