Battery Shield

Anyone think that battery shield is a good idea? I'm thinking about making the battery shield and possible to make it available for sell. This battery shield would be for 9V battery using the connectors in the picture below.

Anyone think that battery shield is a good idea? I'm thinking about making the battery shield and possible to make it available for sell. This battery shield would be for 9V battery using the connectors in the picture below.

It will include ON/OFF switch, power ON indicator LED, and a reset switch. All of the female header sockets will be available on the shield (just like ProtoShield). It will sit on top of the Arduino just like any other shields. This will enable you to have a standalone embedded system without power adapter.

I don't know if this would be useful for other people especially if they have external circuitries then still there are wires coming out of the unit. But, I found it useful that I can easily power up the unit without the wall adapter. Also, ON/OFF switch is a nice feature that Arduino doesn't have. Any thought on this would be appreciated.

It will include ON/OFF switch, power ON indicator LED, and a reset switch. All of the female header sockets will be available on the shield (just like ProtoShield). It will sit on top of the Arduino just like any other shields. This will enable you to have a standalone embedded system without power adapter.

I don't know if this would be useful for other people especially if they have external circuitries then still there are wires coming out of the unit. But, I found it useful that I can easily power up the unit without the wall adapter. Also, ON/OFF switch is a nice feature that Arduino doesn't have. Any thought on this would be appreciated.

http://www.ladyada.net/learn/arduino/starterpack.html#battpack

i like his idea, becuase the battery is onboard the shield, making it much esier to carry around, no more holding the arduino, your project and the battery, if he makes it correctly, he can make everything connect into one neat little protoboard!

try to make it on eagle, and post the pics, see what people say and how they like it, or even make a prototype of your prototype board and see how it works.

i like his idea, becuase the battery is onboard the shield, making it much esier to carry around, no more holding the arduino, your project and the battery, if he makes it correctly, he can make everything connect into one neat little protoboard!

use hotglue or rubberband :)

use hotglue or rubberband :)

rubberband was my idea >:(

a battery shield is cool as well. just maybe it would be nice to add extra circuitry for a 3,3V or 5v regulator option later. this would be practical for breadboarding and standalone atmega projects.

Where do you get these connectors? do they have a name other than battery connectors? i'm looking for something like that as well as connectors for AA batteries and those wristwatch 3v batteries. i just keep finding these plastic boxes.

kuk

use hotglue or rubberband :)

Rubber band! Wow! I hope they use some kind of insulator so the battery won't short the electronic components. :-?

it would be nice to add extra circuitry for a 3,3V or 5v regulator option later. this would be practical for breadboarding and standalone atmega projects.

Arduino already have 5Vreg and 3.3Vreg outputs, why should I add more Vreg circuits?

use hotglue or rubberband :slight_smile:

Rubber band! Wow! I hope they use some kind of insulator so the battery won’t short the electronic components. :-?

if you look at the link in my post, the battery holder is made of plastic :slight_smile:

This would be great for an application that didn't need much power. If you were just running some LEDs and a Ping, it would be a neat way to "package" the controller. If you are running motors, though, you had better use a battery pack. You would hardly believe how fast little DC motors can run down a 9V battery! I tried using a PAIR of 9V batteries (in parallel) to power a Tamiya twin-motor gearbox and as soon as both motors kicked in the batteries just ZEROED.

Arduino already have 5Vreg and 3.3Vreg outputs, why should I add more Vreg circuits?

I still haven't confirmed it to my satisfaction, but apparently the 3.3V is only available when connected via USB.

--Phil.

P.S. See this thread.

I still haven't confirmed it to my satisfaction, but apparently the 3.3V is only available when connected via USB.

Yes, 3.3V is coming from FT232RL USB chip and it is only available when you power the chip through USB port. I've never use 3.3V myself, anyone out there using this?

Yes, 3.3V is coming from FT232RL USB chip and it is only available when you power the chip through USB port. I've never use 3.3V myself, anyone out there using this?

i see. the 3.3v is only on the newer boards. i wasn't aware of that. i needed 3.3v for a graphical LCD (nokia knock-off) and a bluetooth module i'm working with. there are quite many low voltage TTL devices and components out there.

i didn't mean to propose to add the regulators, but to leave some space for them if you're going to manufacture the PCB in quantities. i personally wouldn't need a battery shield so much if it's just holding the battery. i'm fine using a battery pack like ladyada sells them or just a 9v connector cable which i soldered directly to one of my boards. still i see a point in having a compact prototype using a shield. maybe a small prototype area (a grid of holes) next to the battery would be more flexible.

Hej,

I would fully support this shield, though if you want the thing to run on batteries, I would add something special to it like a watchdog to wake up the board XX times/minute and a software library to run this using the hardware interrupt. That would be a killer app. for many projects that just need to read a sensor a few times/minute and update the data somehow. I would enable/disable the option with a jumper, and I would add the footprint for the XBee shield.

As you see, I have been thinking about this one also, but have had no time to implement it ;-). I think it could be a good PCB to have,

/d

I would add something special to it like a watchdog to wake up the board XX times/minute and a software library to run this using the hardware interrupt.

Thanks for your suggestion David. That sound like a great idea and totally doable. Do you know the part number of the watchdog that would do what you said? I only know the one that can program through hardward, which use external capacitor (larger value cap, longer delay). From what you mention seem like you suggest it to be software programmable.

I would add something special to it like a watchdog to wake up the board XX times/minute and a software library to run this using the hardware interrupt.

Thanks for your suggestion David. That sound like a great idea and totally doable. Do you know the part number of the watchdog that would do what you said? I only know the one that can program through hardward, which use external capacitor (larger value cap, longer delay). From what you mention seem like you suggest it to be software programmable.

hmm, why not use the internal WDT?

ladyada:

the idea is to put the board to sleep completely together with it's associated/powered devices and wake it up later. I was just constructing in the example:

http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/ArduinoSleepCode

Do you have a good example in using the internal watchdog and the power consumption it would imply? I am just curious about which would be the best option under different conditions. As you say it might be just some lines of code away and we could implement something like a watchdog library.

/d

Yes, 3.3V is coming from FT232RL USB chip and it is only available when you power the chip through USB port.

I recall reading something about the FDTI chip always being powered now to prevent some bug with the rx/tx pins or something... If that's the case (is it? maybe it's not?) then I wonder why the 3.3V isn't available?

I had a crazy thought wondering if you could take the regulated 5V from the power plug input and plug it into the USB connector to always get 3.3V. :D Haven't looked into this.

I've never use 3.3V myself, anyone out there using this?

I use the 3.3V to power a WIZ810MJ ethernet module in a project I'm developing.

--Phil.

I recall reading something about the FDTI chip always being powered now to prevent some bug with the rx/tx pins or something...

I'm not aware of FDTI chip is always being powered. At least not on my Diecimila neither on the files released Octber 22nd, 2007 in the Arduino Blog http://www.arduino.cc/blog/ (arduino-decimila-reference-design.zip. There is no REV. on the schematic so I'm not sure if this is the latest one. In Windows, you can easily prove that plug in the USB connection while the jumper is in the EXT position. If you hear the USB connection sound from Windows then the FDTI chip is powered. Then for sure you will see 3.3V

If that's the case (is it? maybe it's not?) then I wonder why the 3.3V isn't available?

Sure if FDTI chip is powered, 3.3V is available.

Can someone please confirm that the FDTI chip is now always being powered on the newer release board?

In the Diecimila reference design, the FTDI chip is indeed always powered (at least, if I read it right). It's connected to +5V which is either VCC or USBVCC (depending on the jumper setting).

In the Diecimila reference design, the FTDI chip is indeed always powered (at least, if I read it right). It's connected to +5V which is either VCC or USBVCC (depending on the jumper setting).

mellis...you are correct! At first I thought FTDI chip is power by USBVCC net. I was wrong, it turns out that it use +5V net. In this case FTDI chip is always powered, therefore 3.3V is always there.