Battery Splitting Inquiry

Hi guys. I am totally new to the Arduino world, so please be gentle.

I have an Arduino Uno that I would like to power with a 6v NiMH battery. I will be using it to control six servos along with other sensors. I know that with that many servos, I should have a separate power supply for them. My question is this: Would it be wise to use a splitter (one end of splitter [6v/Ground] plugs into the Arduino, the other [6v only] plugs in to one of the voltage rails on breadboard) or is this not a good idea? I am trying to avoid using two separate batteries, if I can. Please advise. Thanks!

P.S.: I would draw up one of those fancy diagrams to make things clearer, if only I knew how. Please advise on that, too. :slight_smile:

I have an Arduino Uno that I would like to power with a 6v NiMH battery.

That is too much to connect to the 5V power line and not enough to connect to the Vin regulator input.

Would it be wise to use a splitter

I don't know what you mean by a splitter it is not a very precise term.

I would draw up one of those fancy diagrams to make things clearer, if only I knew how.

Pencil and paper. Photograph the paper, reduce to about 800 pixels wide, attach to post with the controls that open up when you click the Additional Options triangle.
Or / and read the how to use this forum sticky post.

That is too much to connect to the 5V power line and not enough to connect to the Vin regulator input.

I am a little confused by this statement. While the recommended voltage input of 7-12V came to my attention after my post, I am not quite sure I understand what you mean regarding the power being too much to connect to the power line.

I don't know what you mean by a splitter it is not a very precise term.

It's not rocket science either. However, I believe the the image below will clarify.

Pencil and paper. Photograph the paper...

Sarcasm detected. Regardless, I did come across Fritzing but the program did not want to run on my computer despite numerous attempts.. Not sure why. Anyway, I drew up my own instead.

This image shows what I was originally hoping to accomplish...although something tells me that aside from using a different battery, I might have to change this idea.

Eureka! After digging around quite a bit more on the Arduino forums, Google, YouTube, etc. regarding the use of the power jack and/or the Vin, it appears that the setup as I have it pictured should work just fine. All I need to do is get a higher voltage battery (7-12V) to start with.

Of course, I will have to add my own voltage regulator setup because most of the servos that I plan on using may start to fry with more than 6 volts. At least that I know how to do having built such a circuit before.

However, if somebody has any reason to say that any part of this idea is still wrong, I would like to hear about it.

Splitting is not a term that is recognised I this context. What you have done is just connected two wires to one point.
No sarcsicam it is my best advice. Using Fritzing is a god dam awful abortion of a program do not use it.

By power line I meant the 5V power line, you put 6V in that and you fry the chip.

Hello, Mike.

I think I have things figured out now. I was not aware that "splitting" was an unrecognized term. I also hope that I did not come off as sounding rude or anything. I am sorry if I did. That certainly was not my intent.

Fine.
In electronics a splitter is something that makes some attempt at matching impedances. So for example you can have a splitter on an antenna to allow you to connect it to two TVs. This has resistors and capacitors in it so that the antenna does not see two input impedances in parallel. That is a passive splitter, there are also active splitters that have amplifiers in them.
In the context of a battery splitter I was not sure what you meant. I thought you might want to reduce a voltage using a potential divider, which is not a good idea.