Beginning Arduino/Circuits - Middle School Age Appropriate

BTW this sketch will cause the light to be red at low voltages and green at 5 volts, and orange when the voltage is in the middle. It fades continuously from one color to another in proportion to the voltage changes. This was JohnRob's take on it.

Again, you can view the full sketch here:

https://create.arduino.cc/editor/ado88/c09ae657-4be8-4687-8d1f-726801bcb99e/preview

@ado88
I have merged your 2 topics which seem to be pretty much the same question on the same subject.

Please read the forum guidelines How to get the best out of this forum

Thanks,

Would there be interest for people to see this on the project hub, possibly with some kind of unit lesson plans? I think that I would refine it more here first. Creating lesson plans is a significant time commitment for the project, so I will likely not pursue it unless there is interest. Also, I would be looking for feedback on the plans as I go, by those who might use it. The lesson plans would use a learning target structure with a simple 5 part lesson, including opening, review of the last lesson, presentation, activity, and closing. An assessment plan would be included, possibly with a unit assessment at the end. Not sure structure, Commonmark Markdown or PDF maybe.

I don't know what kids are generally interested in... Maybe robotics? You could start with sometime "simple" related to servo motors, but there are some complicated things going-on "behind the scenes" in the servo library.

And then it depends on what you want them to learn... Some programming? Some electronics? The core Arduino C++ language is simple enough that I think it makes a GREAT introduction to programming.

But you do have to learn some electronics at the same time and that complicates things. Before you study microcontrollers in college you'd have a couple of years of electronics & programming under your belt. But, most people using the Arduino are self-taught hobbyists so all of the prerequisites aren't required.

I don't know what kids are interested in either.

My thought would be a game of some sort. I've read a number of posts from what appear to be young folks trying to creates some simple game.

Perhaps "Wack a Mole" might be fun and allow venting of excess testosterone. The Mole could be an LED and the wack some robust button. In the advanced Wach a mole you could add a small RD servo and have a physical "mole" pop up.

I think a whack-a-mole game sounds fun, and I think robotics is a definite interest for some kids at least, plus it grounds them for the future. I was thinking that they would learn both programming and electronics basics; for some standards at least, there is a need to use inputs and outputs in a program to create a working project. However, I concede that this is not the most fun project for kids.

The Arduino C++ is a fantastic language to begin with, plus its compatibility with many libraries. I definitely think it could be used more in educational settings.

Maybe this is a better project for an after school program than a class setting, or any spin-offs. Any feedback from educators would be greatly appreciated!

I could be way off here but I think the project should be to make a game of some sort. The C programming would just be part of the process. This as opposed to "....we are going to learn C++ so you could make a game.."
Subtle but I think important mindset.