Bench power supply for 2A motor

Hello,
I am going to purchase this bench power suply below:

Link

I am using a 2A stepper motor driven by the TB6600 stepper.

Even though I have read the useful guide on the basics of the stepper motors, I still have some questions:

  1. I understood the voltage is not a factor for stepper motors but just the max current (2A in this case). Hence, can I provide more than 24V (24V is indicated in link of my motor: Link) ?
  2. if so. I understood the upper threshold will be given by the TB6600 stepper driver (42 V), is that correct?
  3. The max current can be adjusted in the bench power supply. Do I need to provide 2A or even hgher since I regulated the TB6600 for 2A?
  4. I tested the motor with 20V and average 0.6A. The motor was moving but maybe slower than expected. The motor has not been loaded. Is this low amp that affected the performance of the motor?

Sorry for the trivial questions!
Thank you

  1. Correct, but you must set the motor driver to the appropriate current.

  2. No, it is not safe to run any electronics at its absolute maximum rating. Derate by around 25% (say, 35V max).

  3. Set the max current for higher than 2A, but the average current will be less than 2A, depending on the power supply voltage.

  4. The average current is not very meaningful and depends on the motor power supply voltage. The step rate is controlled by the driving computer, not the motor or power supply.

Read the spec sheet carefully. There is no mention of having maximum current and maximum voltage at the same time. Also ALL the ripple and response times are based on milliamp numbers. Typical of Chinese power supplies.

If you do get the unit, be sure to use your DVM along with the builtin metering.

Paul

AntroxEv:
3) The max current can be adjusted in the bench power supply. Do I need to provide 2A or even hgher since I regulated the TB6600 for 2A?

I think that would be a very bad idea. You need a power supply that can comfortably supply the current needed by the motor without limiting it in any way.

The current limit needs to be applied by the stepper motor driver only because it manages the current for every individual step to get the best performance from the motor.

If both the stepper driver and the power supply are trying to limit the current they can easily end up fighting with each other. For example the stepper driver cuts the current, the power supply suddenly sees there no longer a need to limit the current so it ups its voltage. That upsets the calculations done by the stepper driver which had been based on the perceived voltage which the power supply had earlier reduced when it thought the current was going to exceed its limit.

...R

jremington:
4) The average current is not very meaningful and depends on the motor power supply voltage. The step rate is controlled by the driving computer, not the motor or power supply.

Thanks for the replies.
Regarding the last part, yes, I set up the step rate I wanted but since I was providing a too low amperage (0.6A), the motor did not work as I wanted ( I guess).
I will try to supply 2A or little higher to see if it will work better.

Robin2:
I think that would be a very bad idea. You need a power supply that can comfortably supply the current needed by the motor without limiting it in any way.

The current limit needs to be applied by the stepper motor driver only because it manages the current for every individual step to get the best performance from the motor.

If both the stepper driver and the power supply are trying to limit the current they can easily end up fighting with each other. For example the stepper driver cuts the current, the power supply suddenly sees there no longer a need to limit the current so it ups its voltage. That upsets the calculations done by the stepper driver which had been based on the perceived voltage which the power supply had earlier reduced when it thought the current was going to exceed its limit.

...R

Hi, I am not sure if I have used the correct terminology.
The bench power supply I linked has two knobs to control voltage and current.
I understood that I can adjust from 0 to 5A, and in my first test, it was displaying 0.6A that is pretty low I guess.
Hence, I think I need to raise up the current to a value higher than 2A.
In this way, I should avoid the problem you well describe, isn't it?

AntroxEv:
Hence, I think I need to raise up the current to a value higher than 2A.

All the way to 5A would be my suggestion. Electrical devices only take the current they need. Having a 500 amp supply would not matter if the voltage is correct.

...R

Robin2:
All the way to 5A would be my suggestion. Electrical devices only take the current they need. Having a 500 amp supply would not matter if the voltage is correct.

...R

Yeap,
I will
thanks

Paul_KD7HB:
If you do get the unit, be sure to use your DVM along with the builtin metering.

Paul

Hi Paul,
I missed this sentence. What DVM stands for?

AntroxEv:
Hi Paul,
I missed this sentence. What DVM stands for?

Digital Volt Meter.

AntroxEv:
Hi Paul,
I missed this sentence. What DVM stands for?

Google can answer such questions faster!

MarkT:
Google can answer such questions faster!

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=DVM

"DVM is defined as an abbreviation for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree."

Just joking,
thanks for the reply