Bent Pins

Hi All,

Thanks for all the tips and trick on this forum that have got me so far.

As a relative arduino noob, you can imagine my excitement tonight when my strip board mounted arduino clone was blinking at me. As advised I'd uploaded the sketch to my Atmega328 in my (genuine) UNO board, then took the chip out and put into my clone board.

Disaster nearly stuck however when I removed the chip from my board and bent probably half of the pins, two of them very badly. So are there any tips or specific tools for removing these chips. My plan was to use my UNO for prototyping, then uploading a sketch and swapping it into a clone but after tonights experience, I can see that my chips will probably not last long if I keep moving them in and out of the boards.

The next thing I need to start grappling with it getting the bootloader onto some brand new chips, I was not too bothered about being able to upload a sketch at the same time in the breadboard but now I'm starting to think that would be a better way to do things if only to cut down the number of times I need to move the chips around.... and leave my UNO board well and truly alone.

so back to the point, how do I remove a chip without bending pins other than VERY CAREFULLY.

Dave

Get a very small screwdriver and insert it between the chip and the socket at one end. Leaver up a little and then go to the other end and do the same. Take it in very small steps and it will come straight out. The alternative is an IC extractor which clips under each end and you pull straight out. Finally a ZIF (zero insertion force) socked is also good if pricy.

Try this 28-pin ZIF socket:

It’s a few bucks but may be difficult to push into the uno.

Thanks for your help guys. The ZIF socket is an interesting option, but as you say, a little pricey.

I think I will just take it a little more carefully next time, and also try to minimise the number of times I need to take my chip in and out of the UNO.

I will use the screwdriver tip, (as I had done), this is worth thinking about when laying out the clone board because one is tricky to get to.

Thanks again for the speedy support.

DaveyK: Thanks for your help guys. The ZIF socket is an interesting option, but as you say, a little pricey.

I think I will just take it a little more carefully next time, and also try to minimise the number of times I need to take my chip in and out of the UNO.

I will use the screwdriver tip, (as I had done), this is worth thinking about when laying out the clone board because one is tricky to get to.

Thanks again for the speedy support.

It'll get easier every time you remove a chip from that same socket. ;)

And the legs get weaker until metal fatigue breaks them. :)

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As far as the bent pins go, there used to be available a DIP pin straightener tool, but I haven't seen one in a while (haven't really looked lately, either). They were generally meant for DIP ICs whose pins were misaligned; they couldn't straighten everything, but if you were able to carefully bend the pins back into some semblance of "straightness", one of those tools could take it the rest of the way. Even so, it would probably be best afterward to take the device, and mount it (epoxied) in a socket, and only use it for prototyping (DIP IC pins are pretty fragile; some can only take being bent a couple of times before they break off)...

cr0sh: As far as the bent pins go, there used to be available a DIP pin straightener tool, but I haven't seen one in a while (haven't really looked lately, either).

Interesting idea, I wonder if a strip of male header pins would be useful to use as a comb to help get the pitch right.

cr0sh: (DIP IC pins are pretty fragile; some can only take being bent a couple of times before they break off)...

Yes! That is my worry!

spycatcher2k:
Try putting a small strip of paper or plastic under the chip (I have used bits of plastic laminating sheets in the past, but now i have a ‘chip puller’ that I got off fleabay for about 2 pounds.

Drew

Thanks for the idea of strip of plastic drew… i’ll try that.

Also are the chip pullers any good then?
I found this one in my neck of the woods… is this what you mean?
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/NEW-PLCC-IC-Extractor-Puller-Tool-Simple-Chips-DIY-/200595358133?pt=UK_Hand_Tools_Equipment&hash=item2eb46a41b5

Dave

DaveyK:

spycatcher2k: Try putting a small strip of paper or plastic under the chip (I have used bits of plastic laminating sheets in the past, but now i have a 'chip puller' that I got off fleabay for about 2 pounds.

Drew

Thanks for the idea of strip of plastic drew.... i'll try that.

Also are the chip pullers any good then? I found this one in my neck of the woods.... is this what you mean? http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/NEW-PLCC-IC-Extractor-Puller-Tool-Simple-Chips-DIY-/200595358133?pt=UK_Hand_Tools_Equipment&hash=item2eb46a41b5

Dave

NO. That's for a different type of chip, unless you want to sent it to me as a gift (I need one =()

http://www.robotshop.com/elenco-et-10-ic-puller-4.html

As far as the bent pins go, there used to be available a DIP pin straightener tool,

If they ever start making circular ICs then I can use my tube pin straightners.

Seriously... If you are going to move your processor chip frequently then you should invest in an extra 28 pin IC socket. Plug your processor into this extra socket and move the pair back and forth between your UNO and your clone.

Don

If they ever start making circular ICs

They did in the 60s, I still have several 741 op-amps with a circular arrangement of 8 pins.

Grumpy_Mike:

If they ever start making circular ICs

They did in the 60s, I still have several 741 op-amps with a circular arrangement of 8 pins.

I got a few of those, too - got 'em in a pile of junk parts (and by "pile", I mean a large shoebox-sized plastic bin filled to brim with various components - took me weeks to sort and identify) I picked up at Apache Reclamation; I keep them only for historical/collectible value...

:)

They did in the 60s, I still have several 741 op-amps with a circular arrangement of 8 pins.

I forgot all about those. As I recall the ones I had (and probably still have) even came with a plastic pin straightener.

Don

floresta: Seriously... If you are going to move your processor chip frequently then you should invest in an extra 28 pin IC socket. Plug your processor into this extra socket and move the pair back and forth between your UNO and your clone.

Don

Nice idea..... I'll be doing that for certain.