Best Design Practice for a PCB

I’m just learning, and never before this built a robot or designed a PCB. Looking at the breadboard image, and then the PCB image, I have a few questions.

  1. Is there any hope that the PCB will work? Fritzing says there are no problems in the design, but I suspect that, like software, just because it compiles doesn’t mean it will work.

  2. The Speaker and LEDs. Are these solder points for the wires leading to the speaker and LED lights, that are not directly integrated into the PCB?

  3. If in the finished physical robot, the speaker, two LED’s, one IR sensor, the servo, and the bumper sensors (2 buttons) are in the front, one IR sensor and 2 LEDs are in the back, and the motors on the sides, should the PCB be designed so that the soldering points are physically closer on the PCB to their physical parts on the robot?

The answer you will find when you test this circuit on a breadboard for real.

This pcb is kinda confusing, are you designing a new shield? For schematic and pcb you better use other than fritzing; eagle, kicad, altium are better choises.

The robot works. The design you see is pretty much the way I have it wired. I made the bot first, then put together the design and PCB.

When you say shield, do you mean I just need to design the PCB without the Arduino, and then just connect that to the Arduino?

Based upon a pretty long thread here, I downloaded Eagle first. For a beginner's beginner, Eagle was waaaay over my head. Fritzing came real easy since it let me pretty much visualize what I did with the bot and then move that fairly easily into "a" PCB design. Notice I said, "A" design.

So, can I not create a usable PCB from Fritzing?

You understood well what I meant by shield, using the same header arduino distribution.

And about fritzing, I dont know its limitations but seems basic and simple, maybe you cant get gerber files which are very important. Play safe and grab an eagle tutorial on youtube there are for newbies its not difficult. Kicad is also good.

1-Pcbs are made from schematics, not Fritzings. 2- If you don't have schematic capture software just draw the schematic with a black pen on a piece of printer paper and take a photo and post it. 3-You haven't included critical information like ic number of the motor controller (which appears to be an L293) or resistor values etc. 4- The resolution of your Fritzing is so low that the labels on the arduino pins and the ic are unreadable. 5- An arduino draws about 50 mA with nothing connected to it. I see one servo and two devices that could be servos but I don't know because you didn't post a schematic and your Fritzing is not very helpful and no one like Fritzings here anyway because if we need to see what the circuit is there is no substitute for a schematic and if we need to see how you wired it the only thing we accept are photos. 6- As can see from the table in the following link, an alkaline PP3 9V smoke alarm battery like the one you show powering the arduino has an amp hour rating of 0.565 Ah (565 mAh), meaning it can power a 565 mA load for 1 hour, or a 282 mA load for 2 hours or a 188 mA load for 3 hours or a 141 mA load for 4 hours or a 113 mA load for 5 hours etc etc etc. Looking at your circuit, if you plug in the battery at 12 noon, it will be dead by 3pm.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine-volt_battery

I think if you are serious enough to be contemplating this circuit and don't know how to draw a schematic on a piece of paper and post a photo of it then you have your priorities backwards. Knowing how to read and draw schematics effectively is far more important than any one circuit. If I were you I would start researching electronic circuit schematics and make that your #1 priority and put all this other stuff (which is basically electronic toys for entertainment) on a back burner. When you have learned how to read and draw schematics effectively you will eat circuits like this for breakfast and be able to breadboard them in 15 or 20 minutes. (maybe that's all it took you. I don't know , but you get the idea) Moreover, if you buy electronics cookbooks (the electronic version of food cooking cookbooks) you will be able to build anything , anywhere, anytime. When you are learning, cookbooks are worth their weight in gold because they are like a key that unlocks many doors and allows you to go where (you have never gone before). I built a 10 band audio equilizer that was studio quality from LM307 op amps (Normally $3.95 at that time) that I got on sale for 25 cents each. I used Radioshack pots , and perf board and "The Audio Op Amp Cookbook" by Walter Jung. I used it for the front end of a color organ I built.

When you say shield, do you mean I just need to design the PCB without the Arduino, and then just connect that to the Arduino?

replace this:

then just connect that to

with this:

then just plug it into

(the arduino)

You understood well what I meant by shield, using the same header arduino distribution.

Ah, I have some redesigning to do. I assumed it was showing me the Arduino in its PCB design, but now I think it is actually showing me the size and shape of the shield I'm trying to design. I need to move everything onto the main Arduino shaped outline... because now I think those are the headers to which you are referring.

...maybe you cant get gerber files...

It seems to have an export to Gerber (RS-274X). Having just heard about Gerber files, I suspect you'll know better what that means.

Play safe and grab an eagle tutorial on youtube there are for newbies its not difficult

From the general opinions here, I suppose I should.

Moreover, if you buy electronics cookbooks...

Looks like Amazon is going to get more of my money!

Gerber 274x are he standard, then fritzing isnt that bad. Gerber files are used to fabricate pcbs if you purchase the service in a pcb maker company.

Arduino cookbook is good if you know nothing or little.

Arduino cookbook is good if you know nothing or little.

[u]Page 359-362[/u] Chapter 10,5 Controlling AC Devices by Hacking a Remote-Controlled Switch [u]Page 653[/u] "Hacking controllers that were made to control mains voltage or using devices designed to be used with micro-controllers to control AC is often safer than working with mains voltage." (in short , use an opto coupler to short the interleaved gold contacts of a remote control from an AC device remote controller that already has the AC control circuitry instead of trying to design and build the hardware to control the ac) http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=appliance+remote+control&tag=googhydr-20&index=electronics&hvadid=23291962725&hvpos=1t2&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=8901863354552423424&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_2vls3ds3r_b

Open up the remote control and solder 30 guage wirewrap wire to the interleaved gold switch contacts and connect those to the collector and emitter of an opto-isolator ic. (220 ohm resistor in series with the input led , which is controlled with a digital output)

I think i got confused and talked about other book, one that was kinda 20 pages long and only explained transistor or leds. Clearly AC is not for newbies, it can kill you.

see page 653

Clearly AC is not for newbies, it can kill you.

Better be nice to us Newbies if you want that schematic to be right.... XD

Looks like Amazon is going to get more of my money!

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