Better code button and fewer smileys

Thank you to whoever has implemented this.

...R

Wow, now I see what they were doing for the past 6 months.

Very good work, congratulations, well done!

Instead of the “</>” icon, they could put an icon like “CODE” which would be a little more intuitive.

Nice that it is the first icon, but how on earth does that in any way suggest code?

What do chevrons have to do with source code?

If it actually said "[code]" I could follow.

There was some debate about what icon donated "code". At one point there was a suggestion that the word CODE appear.

However I pointed out that CODE was hardly an "icon" that worked in every language.

So, what about the words "const", "int", "char", "unsigned", "long", "return", "false", "true", "if", "else", "case", "switch", "void", "setup", "loop", "write", "read"?

Do they "work in every language"?

Paul__B:
Do they “work in every language”?

The context is very different. The words you quote are words in the C/C++ language - created in the USA, I believe.

The question of using “CODE” or “</>” is a choice to be made by the Arduino Forum Team who are addressing an international audience - and may not be native English speakers themselves.

As a matter of curiosity are there any computer programming languages that are not written in English and which us English speakers may be completely unaware of ? I mean languages that were originally written in (say) French and have never appeared in English.

…R

Paul__B:
So, what about the words "const", "int", "char", "unsigned", "long", "return", "false", "true", "if", "else", "case", "switch", "void", "setup", "loop", "write", "read"?

Do they "work in every language"?

There doesn't seem to be much point to have every damn icon above a post in a language-neutral form, except one.

Robin2:
The context is very different. The words you quote are words in the C/C++ language - created in the USA, I believe.

My point exactly. How do non-English speakers ever manage, writing computer programs?

I've wondered that myself, except maybe they just memorize it in the way we memorize that ! means "not" and % means modulus, and so on. After all, words like "void" and "int" are hardly on everyday lips. And words like "long" and "short" have meanings you might not expect.

Paul__B:
How do non-English speakers ever manage, writing computer programs?

English is steadily taking over the world. Most people who do not speak English have a better knowledge of a second language than do people whose mother tongue is English. And (like it or not) English is a very useful second language.

...R

How do non-English speakers ever manage, writing computer programs?

Stroustrup is a Dane, Torvalds a Finn, Dijkstra Dutch, Wirth Swiss. . .