Bipolar stepper motor?

Hello, I am relatively new to arduino and have worked my way through various examples from books like "getting started with arduino"
and now I am faced with my first real programming task.
The task is:
I need to program arduino to move a slide via a bipolar stepper motor
the problems that I am having are that the stepper motor is built for a higher current than the arduino processing chip.

My hardware consists of:
Arduino UNO
DFRduino Motor Drive
Resistors etc.
Astrosyn Stepper Motor : E231-2

How do I manage to program and set up the stepper motor without destroying the processing chip in the process?

Thank you if you have any answers for me.

the problems that I am having are that the stepper motor is built for a higher current than the arduino processing chip.

Then, you need to use a motor driver.

My hardware consists of:
Arduino UNO
DFRduino Motor Drive
Resistors etc.
Astrosyn Stepper Motor : E231-2

We know what a UNO is, and resistors, etc. is pretty easy to understand. Links to the other devices, though, would make it a lot easier to help you.

Especially if you had a programming question, rather than a Project Guidance question.

The one component we aren't familiar with is your stepper motor. What are its specifications?
It would not be very difficult to use 4 MOSFETs (you need logic level drive mosfets) 4 diodes (to protect the MOSFETs) and 4 resistors from the Arduino pins to the MOSFETs.

Here is an adaptation of some code I wrote for a stepper driver using the Arduino -

/*
 controlling a stepper from the Arduino -
 Pins 9, 10, 11, 12 are tied to transistors 
 for each of the motor phases.
 */

int pin1 =9;
int pin2 = 10;
int pin3 = 11;
int pin4 = 12;
int ctr;
int dir;

void setup()
{
  pinMode(pin1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(pin2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(pin3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(pin4, OUTPUT);
  ctr=0;
  dir = 0;

}

void loop()
{
   dir = 1;  //Direction = 1 or 0, Forward or Reverse
   Step();    // everytime you call Step() the motor will move 1 step.
}

void Step()
{
  if (dir) 
  {
    ctr++ & 3;   // ctr will have values from 0 to 3.
  }
  else 
  {
    ctr-- & 3;
  }

  switch (ctr){
  case 0:
    digitalWrite(pin1,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(pin2,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin3,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin4,LOW);
    break;
  case 1:
    digitalWrite(pin1,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin2,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(pin3,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin4,LOW);
    break;
  case 2:
    digitalWrite(pin1,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin2,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin3,HIGH);
    digitalWrite(pin4,LOW);
    break;
  case 3:
    digitalWrite(pin1,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin2,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin3,LOW);
    digitalWrite(pin4,HIGH);
    break;
  }   
}

There are some more advanced techniques and also code for Half Steps in this thread - Arduino Forum

The stepper motor has the specifications
1.2 volts
1.8 deg
0.6 ohms
2 amps

and the links are
http://www.droboticsonline.com/index.php/dri0001.html

http://www.astrosyn.com/section.php?xSec=7&xPage=1

and I apologise for the typing error bipolar

and I apologise for the typing error bipolar

Rather than apologize, why don't you simply fix it?

From: Loading...

This Arduino Motor shield uses L293B chip and is able to drive two 7-12V DC motors with maximum 1A current each way.

You will not be able to use that to drive a stepper motor that draw up to 2A per coil.

It's difficult to see a relationship between the motor you say you have and the motor link that you provided, to confirm that the current draw you quote is correct. Typically, stepper motors are driven at higher than 12V, to reduce the current required.

PaulS:

and I apologise for the typing error bipolar

Rather than apologize, why don't you simply fix it?

I didn't know that it was possible to fix this.

PaulS:
From: Loading...

This Arduino Motor shield uses L293B chip and is able to drive two 7-12V DC motors with maximum 1A current each way.

You will not be able to use that to drive a stepper motor that draw up to 2A per coil.

It's difficult to see a relationship between the motor you say you have and the motor link that you provided, to confirm that the current draw you quote is correct. Typically, stepper motors are driven at higher than 12V, to reduce the current required.

This motor was given to me and it is specified as I said. However it has turned out that my motor shield is incompatible with stepper motors and so I have bought a new one. Thank you for your support guys I hope that this will be the end of this thread.