Bluetooth, Servo, H-bridge & L293D

Ok I found this tutorial online:

about controlling servo motors via BT-Arduino.

I thought I didn't have an L293D chip but then I noticed there was an alternative to the L239D which is an H-bridge. I read up on H-bridges a little and found out they are used for forking the control of a motor by alternating current flow to different pins of the motor, much like the IC chip would do.

So im wondering, can I just run an example of controlling a servo motor via BT without the L293D? I would only lose the ability of sophisticated control, right?

Marciokoko:
Ok I found this tutorial online:

Arduino - Control DC Motor via Bluetooth | Random Nerd Tutorials

about controlling servo motors via BT-Arduino.

You seem confused about a few points - first off, that tutorial you found was -not- about controlling servos with bluetooth, but rather controlling a brushed DC motor (big difference!) with bluetooth.

Marciokoko:
I thought I didn't have an L293D chip but then I noticed there was an alternative to the L239D which is an H-bridge.

The L293D is an h-bridge, packaged in a DIP IC form.

Marciokoko:
I read up on H-bridges a little and found out they are used for forking the control of a motor by alternating current flow to different pins of the motor, much like the IC chip would do.

More or less; h-bridges basically act to allow you to reverse a DC current flow, typically for motors - but I have seen them (or variants of the circuit) used to drive speakers and other transducers, as well as for power conversion (DC to AC - though it isn't efficient). As for motors, they can be used to not only control brushed DC motors, but steppers and other types as well.

Marciokoko:
So im wondering, can I just run an example of controlling a servo motor via BT without the L293D? I would only lose the ability of sophisticated control, right?

Take the bluetooth code (or something similar) - and hack on some Servo library code, then control your servos that way. It would actually be very simple, beyond the bluetooth implementation. You wouldn't lose anything; you could control several servos in this manner, turning them to whatever position (and at whatever speed) you desired.

But first - you need to understand the differences between a servo motor, and a brushed DC motor (and other motors as well). You need to understand what the term "servo" means (it applies to more than just positioning, by the way). You need to understand how a servo motor works (guess what - it incorporates a motor in it's construction - so in order to understand a servo motor, you need to know how a regular motor works, too). Then - you will have the knowledge to really tell us what you are trying to accomplish.

I only state this because you are confusing a servo motor with a brushed DC motor - and I don't know which you really intend to use, nor for what purpose in order to best advise you on what to use for your needs,

Finally - note that it is really worth your time to have a good understanding of -exactly- how and why a motor works (that is, how magnetic fields can be used to create rotational motion); indeed, the history of the electrical motor, and all the discoveries and invention that led to practical implementations is a very fascinating - and educational - topic on its own!