Bootloaded Atmega 1280?

Does anyone know where I can find one sold? I really don't want to buy a Mega just to for the chip...

On a similar note, does anyone know if Seeeduino's Mega uses the same bootloader as the standard Mega?

I haven't seen one.

And i also think that it comes only as a surface mount chip.

Yea, I know, but I've been practicing SMD soldering so hopefully I will be able to use it on a custom board.

Cool, i guess i'll have to learn SMD soldering one of theese days.

The easiest path might just be to add the ISP connections on your new layout and burn the bootloader via the Arduino ISB and a compatible programmer.

Lefty

Are you saying that I can get an Atmega 1280 without the bootloader, and then burn one myself? Hmm, perhaps it's time I get a programmer then... Any suggestions on which to get?

Erm, what's an ISB?

Erm, what's an ISB?

That's a mistype, meant ICSP, the six pin connection on most standard Arduino boards. As far as programmers I like:

http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=16&products_id=46

If you don't like to build your own then an equivent one on E-bay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170376999470&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

You will notice in the Arduino IDE tools menu, the last listed selection is to burn a new bootloader and it selects a menu of supported hardware burners. You just have to first select the proper board type (processor selection) before proceduing with the burner options so that it will use the proper bootloader file from the core library.

Lefty

Are you saying that I can get an Atmega 1280 without the bootloader, and then burn one myself? Hmm, perhaps it's time I get a programmer then...

And once you get the programmer going ... there is no need for a bootloader. The bootloader is just an on-chip "programmer" that lowers the threshold towards getting started with development.

The bootloader may of course add value as a field upgradeable system, but you could also bring your programmer along for the upgrade. The programmer has its own USB interface, so you may even skip the USB/serial chip for custom designs when there is no need for USB connectivity for other purposes besides program upload.

I actually ordered an AVRISP mkII ISP this morning. Going to get my hands dirty doing my own programming.

Please let us now about your progress.

Thanks

I ordered the ISP and a few Atemga168's from Digikey (they were sold out of the 328's). I'm going to use my Arduino as a programmer via the ICSP pins. What's the best way to pull my 328 out of the socket without bending the pins?

What’s the best way to pull my 328 out of the socket without bending the pins?

One way is to work a small flat bladed jeweler’s screwdriver between the chip and the socket at each end. Work up a little clearance to each end at a time, alternately, until the chip can be gently removed with your fingers.

Lefty

you can get ic pullers, but the el-cheapo ones often dont grip worth a flip a screwdriver is safer

but we have a few of these floating around at work, and back when we used dips they came in handy

http://parts.digikey.com/1/parts/303260-tool-extractor-ic-dip-24-40pin-ex-2.html

http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=K157-ND

Would those be useful?

usually i dont have luck with those

ok.. If there is any tools on digikey $5 or less to pull ICs, feel free to suggest one :)

TBH, i have a couple sets of those, seems like one of 3 things happen

I have to rock the chip out, and with those salad tongs I have squat feeling or control and I bend a pin

Trying to pull them directly out usually makes me punch myself or something near by as your arm goes flailing around with more than 100lbs of force once it pops free

they slip and crack the edge of the chip, I wouldn't bother unless you got a little pc kit or something that came with them

salad tongs

I agree that they don't work very well. The upward force required is such that it is hard to maintain a level extraction and usually one end of the chip will pull out before the other ending up with bent pins as the chip pops in one quick motion rather then a smooth controlled extraction. While it can take a little longer, but using a small blade alternately at each chip end is much more gentle on the chip package and pins.

Lefty

Can anyone help pick out the "correct" 1280 from the lot? Seems mouser is once again trying to confuse me...

http://www.mouser.com/Search/Refine.aspx?Keyword=ATMEGA+1280

Hopefully the only one with stock on hand ;)

Lefty