Breadboard series/parallel?

I have a DHT11 sensor and a 16x2 LCD screen which both need ground/+5v.

The breadboard I see is a series of vertical strips, separated in the middle.

If I use one strip for the +v with the 5v power from the arduino on the end of the strip, and the DHT11 and LCD plugged into the same strip, will the LCD and DHT affect each others voltages? (ie series).

Like I said I am using one strip for +v and one for gnd, everything that needs either of those is just plugged into that strip and connected to the arduino. If I need a resistor as for the LCD, I connect it either side of the breadboard seperator, so that the current connects the strips through the resistor.

E.G for the LCD pin #15 'A' (I think its the backlight), is connected to a bottom strip, then a resistor leads to the top strip, which has the LCD pin #2 'VDD', the DHT pin #1 +v, and a wire from the 5v power on the arduino connected (in that order).

So would the resistor used for the backlight of the LCD affect the voltage of the DHT and vica versa? The +v from the LCD VDD port also contains a resistor joining two strips before it is connected to the "+v top strip".

Please tell me if this is wrong and if I should be using some kind of parallel connection, and how? :S

If I understand you, then they won't be in series; they will be parallel. I take it that you don't have some long "horizontal" tie strips on the outer edges? That's usually where you find the power "rails" on a breadboard. You can take empty "vertical" strips and use them as common tie points, if you run out just connect in another strip of 5.

Having your two devices powered in series would mean that you had the ground pin of the first device feeding into the positive power input on the second device. Kinda like batteries.

afremont:
Having your two devices powered in series would mean that you had the ground pin of the first device feeding into the positive power input on the second device. Kinda like batteries.

… and isn’t useful here. Components taking a 5V supply are all connected in parallel to the 5V rails. Since the supply acts
to keep the rails a constant 5V apart no device should be aware of the others (unless the supply is overloaded).

MarkT:

afremont: Having your two devices powered in series would mean that you had the ground pin of the first device feeding into the positive power input on the second device. Kinda like batteries.

... and isn't useful here. Components taking a 5V supply are all connected in parallel to the 5V rails. Since the supply acts to keep the rails a constant 5V apart no device should be aware of the others (unless the supply is overloaded).

Wow..... The OP thought he was putting his devices in series, at least according to what he wrote in his post. I just wanted to explain to him what it would actually mean to have his devices wired in series AFTER I assured him that he wasn't doing that. Sorry you feel it wasn't useful, hopefully the OP doesn't feel the same way since he was the one with the question.