Breaking capacity by AWG

For God's sales you think you'd find this on Google... NOTHING relates AWG to breaking capacity as in when fuse blows. Any idea what has break cap of 1-5 amperes?

AWG is clearly the main determinent of breaking capacity.

https://www.powerstream.com/wire-fusing-currents.htm

mattlogue:
For God's sales you think you'd find this on Google... NOTHING relates AWG to breaking capacity as in when fuse blows. Any idea what has break cap of 1-5 amperes?

One would normally just use a fuse when you want a fuse.

mattlogue:
For God's sales you think you'd find this on Google... NOTHING relates AWG to breaking capacity as in when fuse blows. Any idea what has break cap of 1-5 amperes?

AWG is clearly the main determinent of breaking capacity.

Of course it doesn't, since the fuse value relates to the insulation on the wire(any size) melting and letting the now bare wire touch something and causing a fire.

Paul

Use cheap, thin wire to protect the expensive fuses.

jremington:
Use cheap, thin wire to protect the expensive fuses.

And use even cheaper transistors to protect the wire that protects the fuses.

mattlogue:
For God’s sales you think you’d find this on Google… NOTHING relates AWG to breaking capacity as in when fuse blows. Any idea what has break cap of 1-5 amperes?

AWG is clearly the main determinent of breaking capacity.

The breaking capacity of a fuse is determined by the construction method and the voltage involved and whether ac or dc. For large DC voltages and current you have to use specialist fuses to quench the arc, which otherwise
will not stop.

For high AC voltages the zero-crossing helps with arc-quench, but sand-filled fuses are normally needed at mains
voltage even so.

For the current that actually melts a fuse wire, this is affected by the length of the fuse, whether its slow-blow, quick-blow, specialized alloy fuse wire, and whether its sand-filled.

So there is no one answer to your question.

dl324:
One would normally just use a fuse when you want a fuse.

Broke :{

mattlogue:
Broke :{

Fuse wire is different to normal wire, it melts at a much lower temperatue, to avoid the risk of fires.

Setting fire to your house will make you Broke++;

srnet:
Fuse wire is different to normal wire, it melts at a much lower temperatue, to avoid the risk of fires.

Setting fire to your house will make you Broke++;

heh... Yeah

srnet:
Fuse wire is different to normal wire, it melts at a much lower temperatue, to avoid the risk of fires.

And is contained inside a ceramic or glass tube!

They are surprisingly expensive looks like they come to like $1.50 for fuse holder + fuse in quantities of 10 via ebay (which is probably a reasonable way to buy such simple commodity componet)

For low currents, you can also use PTC self-resetting fuses. Cheap (like $4-6 for 10 for 500mA ones) on ebay.

mattlogue:
heh... Yeah

Indeed, and its surprising how often people try to take shortcuts with fuses, just to save very small amounts of money.

And then there are the expensive fuses. Our 200 amp, 3-phase, meter panels for my plant use 200 amp fuses. I think they blow at 201 amps, but hold 200 amps for ever. They are about $75 a “pop”. We popped several getting the new oven working a year ago.

Paul

srnet:
Fuse wire is different to normal wire, it melts at a much lower temperatue, to avoid the risk of fires.

Wrong and wrong. Fuses and fuse wire can be many different metals including copper, silver, aluminium, zinc, tin and more. A failing fuse generates a shower of sparks from the arc, which can easily start a fire if not enclosed in an inert enclosure (which is why fuses are always enclosed in a tube, or consumer unit). Low melting
point metals can't magically prevent arcing !!