Brushed 12v DC Motor Control using Arduino Uno

Goal:
Control the speed of a Brushed 12v DC Motor with a peak amperage of 5 amps using the Arduino Uno. Solidworks modeling revealed I need a peak amperage of 5 Amps to the motor.

Existing parts list:
http://www.robotshop.com/en/banebots-rs-775-7300rpm-brushed-dc-motor.html

Background:
I’m not well versed in the aspects of a “motor controller” but was given this RioRand PWM Controller and am curious if it would even work in my application. I’ve tested that the motor works using the potentiometer on the RioRand and can assume that the motor spins up to max RPM (I don’t have a way to measure RPM feedback from the spinning shaft except by measuring voltage provided to the motor pins).

Questions:

  • Is the RioRand the right part for the job? It appears to have 2 Mosfet chips on it being heatsinked and a gambit of capacitor protection.
  • What would be the recommended solution to my goal? Wiring diagrams are appreciated.

This is my 2nd post on the forums and found the first to be very helpful. Simply finding my other post will reveal the bigger picture to the problem at hand.

RioRand PWM DC Converter.jpg

Stall current is 30A. You need a motor driver that is capable to supply 30A. The electronics that controls the motor is often called a 'motor driver'. This is a motor driver : http://www.pololu.com/product/705

You can copy a link in the post. This is a link to your first topic : http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=252045

I don't know what to think about the motor driver. Does it have the abality to connect an Arduino somewhere ? And it is 10A, when the motor stalls (with sand or dirt or someone holding it back) it is broken.

@Peter_n I agree about the stall current. Isn't there a cheaper alternative? I'm only trying to turn the motor in one direction and to utilize the PWM capabilities of the Arduino.

Would the links below be sufficient?

Is there a difference between Stepper Motor and DC Motor Drivers?

Stepper Motor 43A H-Bridge Drive for Arduino DC Motor Driver 43A H-Bridge for Arduino

Those drivers in the links seem okay, I think they are the same. The first one has 'stepper' in the title, that might be an error, in the description there is no 'stepper' mentioned. It is for normal motors.

A good stepper motor driver is something special. A stepper motor driver should focus on current driving. And it doesn't have to be able to do high frequency pwm.

if yo just need to control the motor speed and not direction, a logic lrvel MOSFET like below might work.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10213

zoomkat: if yo just need to control the motor speed and not direction, a logic lrvel MOSFET like below might work.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10213

I'd like to control a DC motor speed and braking but not direction... Can I use the above and get freewheeling and 'fast' braking as per my L298? Advice, schematics etc much appreciated.

acboother:

zoomkat: if yo just need to control the motor speed and not direction, a logic lrvel MOSFET like below might work.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10213

I'd like to control a DC motor speed and braking but not direction... Can I use the above and get freewheeling and 'fast' braking as per my L298? Advice, schematics etc much appreciated.

You need a half-H-bridge to do braking. The BTS7960 is such a device (usually comes two-to-a-board to make a full H-bridge), like here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Motor-Driver-BTS7960-43A/. The simplest way to manage braking is use synchronous rectification mode, then the PWM duty cycle controls the speed directly and linearly, and reducing it will actively slow the motor down, regeneratively braking (if the supply is a battery). Alternatively turn the low-side switch on solid for hard braking.

hi, i am salah i want to controle a dc motor 12V with my arduino uno and using L298 bridg please i need help gays

That RioRand controller is likely under-powered for the task (RioRand doesn't list it on their site - but they sell similar controllers), but it is essentially a PWM half-bridge. That 8-pin chip on the left is likely a 555 time configured as a multivibrator - PWM controlled by a potentiometer connected to the 3-pin connector at the top of the image (wiper is likely center pin). Find the PWM output of the 555 (shouldn't be too hard - this is a common circuit for motor control - tons of schematics online, and likely the manufacturer just lifted one), cut that pin, and solder an Arduino output in it's place.

More or less. You might need an extra transistor or something to turn on the mosfet properly, as the 555 was likely running on 12 volts or whatnot.

One of the green connectors is for the motor supply battery; the other to the motor. If you wanted directional control, a simple DPDT relay (or two SPDT relays) wired as an h-bridge could do it. Just don't switch the relay while PWM'ing the controller...or you may weld the relay contacts.

acboother:
I’d like to control a DC motor speed and braking but not direction… Can I use the above and get freewheeling and ‘fast’ braking as per my L298? Advice, schematics etc much appreciated.

You need a half-H-bridge to get braking. You’ll get stiffer speed control too.

MarkT: You need a half-H-bridge to get braking. You'll get stiffer speed control too.

I used half of one of these in the end. http://www.instructables.com/id/Motor-Driver-BTS7960-43A/

Cheers Alan