Brushless Gimbal Motors

Hi,

I'm a student and for my graduation I'm trying to build a brushless gimbal with a couple of friends.
Our project includes writing the software needed for stabilization and constructing the frame.

My problem is I can't find any information on how to control the motors. I'm familiar with normal brushless motors used for multicopters (and thus with ESCs), but not with the ones typically used for gimbals (f.ex. T-Motors GB54-1). Initially I thought I could just buy some ESCs for them, but then I realized that there are none on the market and that the connectors on the motors are different than those I'm used to.
Most of the other "diy" projects I've seen so far seem to spare the software part and use AlexMos BGC instead.

So my question is: What is the best way to approache this problem? Do I have to build and program corresponding drivers myself (like this?). Are there any solutions available on the market?

Thanks in advance
Josua

Sensored or sensorless motor?

Given that the same company seems to supply RC ESCs for brushless motors, and that they also supply brushless motors, and they seem to have a focus on the multi-blade copter business - I would make the guess that a standard ESC for a BLDC motor (sized properly) will work...

The thing that I don't understand about these motors, though, is the seeming lack of gearing? I can't really make heads or tails of that manufacturer's site - is the term "Gimbal" being used to denote the series (ie - the "Antigravity" series certainly doesn't have anything to do with gravity - so is it likewise for the "Gimbal" series?). There isn't enough data on the motors to actually know what their application is for; it really seems like it is meant to spin a propeller, and not for any low-speed positioning (despite the photo with the product - remember, this is a chinese manufacturer, where anything seemingly goes with marketing).

I could be completely wrong...

No, gimbal motors have to hold torque at stationary, so standard sensorless ESCs are
not going to work. There are ways to drive a sensorless motor (by probing inductance)
at zero speed, but they are complex and its more likely a hall-sensor motor is used,
then standard 3-phase brushless commutation approach is used - wrap the whole
thing in PID loop for position feedback.

cr0sh:
Given that the same company seems to supply RC ESCs for brushless motors, and that they also supply brushless motors, and they seem to have a focus on the multi-blade copter business - I would make the guess that a standard ESC for a BLDC motor (sized properly) will work...

To size the ESCs properly could get rather difficult since there are hardly any ESCs under 10A and gimbal motors seem to need around 1A maximum.
The motors I referred to are designated for gimbals. I have seen many projects using exactly those motors, but almost every gimbal motor will do for me as long as it can support the camera weight. You can google for gimbal motor and you will find lots of similar (looking) motors (with a hollow shaft).
The lack of information about gimbal motors drives me crazy. No manufacturer seems to think it is necessary to provide details about current, voltage or torque...

MarkT:
There are ways to drive a sensorless motor (by probing inductance)
at zero speed, but they are complex and its more likely a hall-sensor motor is used,
then standard 3-phase brushless commutation approach is used - wrap the whole
thing in PID loop for position feedback.

All the approaches I've seen so far (professional and diy) use exactly this type of motors. I think it's important to note that brushless gimbal motors are not the same as brushless motors used for multicopters.

Here is a picture of a 2 axis gimbal that looks like it uses a non feedback motor (just 3 wires).

I’m guessing that In the control loop it looks at the output from the gyro and tries to maintain that.

The motor does not really need to spin( if it did then things would get a little wrapped up) but just act like roughly a 90 degree actuator so the controller probably has a fine sine lookup table to drive the coils in very small steps.