Building a system without connecting to interface

Hey guys, I was wondering how do systems run without it being connected to a computer? For example when I build projects I connect a Arduino to computer and program the system... but how do systems work without connecting to a pc... for example Automatic hand sanitizers. So if i build a system how can i make it work without connecting it to a pc.

2donboi2: Hey guys, I was wondering how do systems run without it being connected to a computer? For example when I build projects I connect a Arduino to computer and program the system... but how do systems work without connecting to a pc... for example Automatic hand sanitizers. So if i build a system how can i make it work without connecting it to a pc.

Power it from a battery or a wall wart or a cell phone charger. Lots of options.

Paul

There was a world before micro-controllers. Automatic hand sanitize system? I would likely look for a sensor to detect the presence of a hand to sanitize. So how would you sense a hand? Then I likely need some sort of timed mechanism (electro-mechanical) to dispense a sanitize solution. Maybe a simple and ancient timer solution like the 555 timer and maybe configure the circuit as a One Shot so when my sensor sends it a signal my counter timer will output a pulse of a pre determined time length. During that pulse cycle I dispense my liquid.

You start at the beginning and then using discrete components you design what you want. Actually you start with a clean sheet of white paper, a pencil, and a large eraser and draft what you want a circuit to do. Then you apply your knowledge base and make a circuit happen.

Would you believe that before color TV it was black and white and micro circuits were light years away.

Ron

How about that steam powered PC that controlled the Wabash Cannonball? ;D

2donboi2: Hey guys, I was wondering how do systems run without it being connected to a computer? For example when I build projects I connect a Arduino to computer and program the system... but how do systems work without connecting to a pc... for example Automatic hand sanitizers. So if i build a system how can i make it work without connecting it to a pc.

Hi, have you made Arduino projects that work without a PC connected? Tom.... :)

Hey guys, I was wondering how do systems run without it being connected to a computer? For example when I build projects I connect a Arduino to computer and program the system.

99% of the time the project/product runs stand-alone after programing. i.e. If you load the Blink Example and disconnect from the computer and plug-into a separate power supply, the program will run and the LED will blink.

Of course some projects/products interact with a computer.

...There was a time when chips were programmed directly in binary (or octal or hex) by hand one machine-code instruction at a time. And, human "assemblers" would convert assembly language into machine code. Then, once you had a "master" PROM or EPROM there were machines that could program copies. But, it didn't take long for somebody to figure-out how to use a computer and to make a cross-compiler so a higher-level language could be used.

And, microprocessors were around for about 10 years before personal computers became affordable and widely available.

2donboi2:
Hey guys, I was wondering how do systems run without it being connected to a computer? For example when I build projects I connect a Arduino to computer and program the system… but how do systems work without connecting to a pc… for example Automatic hand sanitizers. So if i build a system how can i make it work without connecting it to a pc.

Something like that probably doesn’t have or need a microprocessor. It is just a circuit that detects an object and runs a small motor for a second. Projects that do use a controller though can be run from battery. Once you load the sketch you can disconnect from the computer. Apply power to the board and it runs. The memory is non-volatile, meaning it doesn’t get lost when power is removed.

Everything uses microcontrollers these days, its often cheaper to do so as MOSFETs are cheaper than high-current mechanical switches, and you can easily add auto-off (which is essential for most battery powered devices). All microcontrollers support sleeping and micro-power clock-rates.