can a 4000 series cmos logic chips replace an arduino?

lets say I have a final project and everything is more or less wrapped up, and it isn’t a complex project, like controlling a few leds, can you push code onto a logic chip? I have grown too understand how logic gates work in that they use levels of electronic signals too generate values but I don’t know if there is a way too push code on too them so they behave differently than just a logic gate…

sorry if this is a stupid question :frowning: I have a bunch of 4000 series chips and have been trying too see how I can use them and if replacing my arduino nanos with them is a route I can take.

Given enough of them of course you can replace an Arduino with logic chips. After all a microcontroller is just a bunch of logic gates. But what you can't do is program a logic chip, you have to wire them the correct way.

It's just that you need a room full of dedicated logic chips instead of one Nano!

can you push code onto a logic chip

You can if the chip is an FPGA, but that is not a 4000 series logic chip nor a beginner thing to do. And it is way more expensive than an Arduino.

In certain applications you may be able to replace Arduino by discrete logic chips. In same cases discrete logic chips may be able to do things Arduino is unable to do without a support circuit (such as counting very fast events, interfacing higher voltage systems directly). BUT it requires very different way of thinking and designing of the board. Except for the simplest cases it will be more complicated and more expensive than using Arduino. There is no way to take a working Arduino sketch and "force" it into logic chips. You need to start from the very beginning, maybe using the sketch as a guide. In theory it is possible to build an Arduino from logic chips. But it will need orders of magnitude more current, space and will be much much slower. In other words there are applications where Arduino cannot be replaced by simple logic chips. Conclusion: logic chips may be only rarely used to replace an Arduino. But they may be used WITH Arduino to make your life easier. Or even enable Arduino to do something otherwise impossible or requiring much faster processor.

Nalyd: sorry if this is a stupid question :( I have a bunch of 4000 series chips and have been trying too see how I can use them and if replacing my Arduino Nanos with them is a route I can take.

Well ...

So that is the problem.

You have a quantity of relatively obsolete chips which are really in no way related to an Arduino.

And you want to do just something with them. :astonished:

You are asking this in the wrong forum; this is about Arduinos. Yes, we will answer questions related to obsolete logic chips if you actually have an application for them, but beyond that it is a bit of an ask. :roll_eyes:

I could suggest you look up "CMOS 4000 projects" on DuckDuckGo (or Google) but there is a major danger you will waste a lot of your time. What you really want is this book which is authoritative. You may find it in a good library (college library?).

You can do a lot with logic chips (and other analog & digital chips). They can be useful for things that have a fixed-purpose and don't need programming.

Computers did exist before microprocessors and microcontrollers. You can build your own processor "from scratch", but it's a nightmare to build, test, and debug, and it won't be very powerful.

The programmable microprocessor "changed the world", and the first practical home/hobby computer (the Altair 8800) was built around the Intel 8080 microprocessor.

A couple of times, I was starting to design something and it was getting very complicated (on paper) until I thought about using a microcontroller.

I did start off making things with individual logic chips in the 60s and 70s.

What attracted me to micro processors in the mid 70s was that I could simply change the operation of a device I was building by simply changing the code instead of redesigning the circuit and rebuilding the circuit. So in terms of time, 5 minutes verses two or three days.

https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/cmos-cookbook_don-lancaster/586345/#isbn=0672213982&idiq=2976145 US$ 4.19 plus shipping.

wvmarle: you have to wire them the correct way.

FPGAS IN NUTSHELL

jremington: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/cmos-cookbook_don-lancaster/586345/#isbn=0672213982&idiq=2976145 US$ 4.19 plus shipping.

A lot cheaper than the Amazon link I gave! :astonished:

And you wonder why Amazon is making money hand over fist?

I didn't say I wondered that!

I buy off eBay, not Amazon. :astonished:

My old copy of the “CMOS Cookbook” is priced
at $24.95US. I think someone slipped a decimal
point, and that cost should be $41.95.
Herb

I don't know if there is a way too push code on too them so they behave differently than just a logic gate..

No. 4000 series logic chips are what they are. There is no way to change them either by code or other means.

that cost should be $41.95

Order it now and get an amazing bargain!

CMOS Cookbook is available as a Free Download

Well worth it!