Can I use this type of cable on my arduino (beginner)

Hi there,

quick question:

can I use this cable as jumper cable on my arduino?

http://www.produktinfo.conrad.com/datenblaetter/600000-624999/605615-da-01-en-LIY_LITZE_0_50_QMM_10_M_ROT.pdf

Thanks, Jane

Can you convert that to working link by highlighting it and clicking the LINKS (chain link symbol) button so I can view it from my mobile phone ?

Surely, should be working now

Thanks, it’s working now. FYI, when using the LINKS toolbutton, the forum software is designed to allow you to assign a label or name for the link (like “this cable”).
ie:
this cable

this is done by entering the label (called “displayed text”) in the second pop up prompt when using the LINKS button.

Some people are too lazy to even use the links button (which I never understoond) so they do what you did (which, by the way, I know you did only because you were not aware of the LINKS button).

Some people are not too lazy to use the LINKS button but they are TOO busy to enter a label in the second pop up window so they just click the LINKS button and paste the link into BOTH pop up boxes. This accomplishes the function of making a WORKING link (which, to be fair, is the most important thing) but fails to accomplish the function of assigning a label to the link (like “this thing”). I guess you can’t win 'em all.

REGARDING CABLE

there are several things to note about this cable
First , there is no AWG size designation, consequently , you have to calculate the conductor area and look up the AWG .

DIAMETER of CONDUCTORS: 0.2 mm
NUMBER of CONDUCTORS: 16

FORMULA for AREA of a CIRCLE: Pi * r2

RADIUS of ONE CONDUCTOR: DIAM/2
0.2mm/2=0.1 mm

AREA of ONE conductor: 3.14159265359 * (0.1)2
3.14159265359 * (0.01) = 0.0314159265358979323846264338328

AREA of WIRE = Number of conductors * Area of ONE conductor
= 16 * 0.0314159265358979323846264338328 mm
= 0.50265482457436691815402294132472 mm

AREA of WIRE = 0.50265482457436691815402294132472 mm

Once you have the area of the wire you need to convert that AWG.
Unfortunately, there is no mm to AWG online calculator , but there is an AWG to mm online calculator

(see how that link label comes in handy ?)

So if you only have an AWG to mm calculator, obviously you must resort to approximation by starting too small and decreasing the AWG # (INCREASING the WIRE SIZE)
“too small” would be something like 30 guage , so you enter 30 AWG , click calculate and the result is much smaller than 0.50265482457436691815402294132472 mm, so you increase by 2 to 28, then 26, then 24 then 26 and find that your wire area (0.50265482457436691815402294132472 mm) is closest to 24 guage wire. Since I have used 24 guage wire wrap wire for arduino proto boards , I happen to know it’s fine for that, but don’t take my word for it, look it up here (see how that links label comes in handy ?)

You can see that the current rating of 24 guage wire for chassis wiring is 3.5 A.
Since the maximum current the onboard 5V regulator on the arduino can source is about 800 mA or 0.8A then your wire is more than sufficient.

CAN I USE THIS CABLE.jpg

AWG to mm to obtain mm to AWG.jpg

Okay, well I simply didnt know. Sorry bout that.

So: Can i use this cable on my UNO?

See Reply # 3 (that's the thing about forum posts. They prefer you modify your last post and append the new information to it than make another post right after your last one. If you had posted your last reply immediately BEFORE I decided to add to mine then I would probably have created a new post but since that didn't happen, I have to send you BACK IN TIME (so to speak) to when I modified Reply #3) Does that make sense ?

jane_mr: Okay, well I simply didnt know. Sorry bout that.

So: Can i use this cable on my UNO?

i would, but it is very thick for "hook up cable"!

but i am intrigued as to why you are actually asking?

i would, but it is very thick for "hook up cable"!

How do you figure 1.8 mm (+/- 0.1 mm) is THICK ?

Jane, I assume you didn't mean you were planning to use this cable with BREADBOARDED circuits on a "plug in" bread board ? If so, I would recommend using ONLY factory made arduino jumper cables or 20 gauge SOLID COPPER insulated hookup wire. In other words , if you wanted to use your cable you would have to solder 1 inch pieces of 20 gauge SOLID copper insulated hookup wire to BOTH ends of your cable because it is not solid wire.

raschemmel: If so, I would recommend using ONLY factory made arduino jumper cables or 20 gauge SOLID COPPER insulated hookup wire.

20 gauge hookup wires are all "male", so it's better to go with factory made jumper cables which also have a "female" option.

@jane

Why not go with the regular DuPont jumper wires? |500x500

@Noobian, I think it's a bit premature to be making assumptions about gender. The OP has NOT defined "jumper" so she could mean anything. Since she is a newbie, it is unlikely she even knows what YOU mean by "jumper".

raschemmel: How do you figure 1.8 mm (+/- 0.1 mm) is THICK ?

are you saying it is THIN ?

raschemmel: @Noobian, I think it's a bit premature to be making assumptions about gender. The OP has NOT defined "jumper" so she could mean anything. Since she is a newbie, it is unlikely she even knows what YOU mean by "jumper".

Also called a pullover or sweater :roll_eyes:

Sorry, I typed it from memory and forgot the “1” after the decimal point. Good catch though.
It’s actually a phone number: (if you drop the 3 and the decimal point)

1 (415) 926-5359 ( SLAC : ( Stanford Linear Accelerator Center))

@ Noobian,
1.8 mm OD is not thick. ( at least not too thick). It probably is thicker than the Solid 20 gauge I recommended.

Based on THIS datasheet, the solid copper hookup wire is 1.7526 mm OD, which is < the 1.8 mm OD of the OP’s wire by 0.0474 mm, which means if you want to call the OP’s wire THICK, then you might as well call 20 guage solid copper insulated hookup wire THICK because it is only 0.0474 mm smaller.

Would you call 20 ga. solid copper insulated hookup wire “thick” ? (I wouldn’t, but that’s just me)

solid copper HOOKUP WIRE DIAM in mm.jpg

Funny that we haven’t heard back from the OP. I wonder if she’s sleeping.

raschemmel: Would you call 20 ga. solid copper insulated hookup wire "thick" ?

Well if it's for breadboard use it seems a little big. You don't want to use too big or it will ruin the contacts. 22 AWG is the largest I'd consider using on my breadboards. I think the jumpers are about 24 AWG.

They're spring metal clips. You can use anything that fits in the hole. That's why it's called"spring metal". It returns to it's original size.

Yes 20 will spring the springs ;)

I always limit 'jumper wires' to 26-24, maybe some times 22

I 'never' plug anything in the holes nearest the center trough, except for I.C.s

.

raschemmel: You can use anything that fits in the hole.

I disagree, you put a 7805 in there and it's never the same, then try using that hole with a 1/8W resistor and it's not a good connection anymore. Maybe it depends on the quality of the breadboard.

There's no data to support that statement.

For what it's worth, I think RadioShack has 22 gauge solid. Hookup wire.

raschemmel: @Noobian, I think it's a bit premature to be making assumptions about gender. The OP has NOT defined "jumper" so she could mean anything. Since she is a newbie, it is unlikely she even knows what YOU mean by "jumper".

Maybe she should get a 'gender fluid ' cable :D

btw she clearly mentions -hey b0ss "can I use this cable as jumper cable on my arduino?" However she has not mentioned what type of Arduino she is using (or what type of headers that Arduino has)? if it's UNO then she can use "male", but if it's them tiny ones she needs "female".

If she is a newbie, then she should definitely go for the regular dupont jumper wires instead of worrying about wire thickness.

raschemmel: @ Noobian, 1.8 mm OD is not thick. ( at least not too thick). It probably is thicker than the Solid 20 gauge I recommended.

You mean @Wareemba ??