Can someone identify this component?

Can someone tell me what that little metal cylinder is?
I've seen it in 2 things I've taken apart in the last week, and as you could imagine, searching little metal cylinder on google probably brings up everything but the answer.

Thanks

Maybe one of these....

A crystal component maybe. Or maybe a capacitor.

You should also mention whether or not it has any numbers or writing on the side of it.

It looks like a crystal to me too, but it could also be a trembler switch. But usually those have a lead coming from the center of the clinder, and one from the edge. Can you show it's underside?

Yes it could be a tilt switch. If so it has a very small ball baring inside that shorts out those two wires at the end. You should be able to here / feel this as you tilt it upside down.

Definitely possibility of it being a tilt switch too.

https://images.asianproducts.com/images/pbimage/7/P11798197751835801b.jpg

Here's how you tell: Measure the resistance from one lead to the other. Then tilt it 45 degrees or so. If it changes a lot, it's a trembler. If it stays the same, it's most likely a crystal. Also crystals are usually a bit narrower than tremblers, like maybe 3mm vs 5mm.

Another clue might be - what was that thing before it got taken apart?

Thanks, yeah its definitely a crystal, and it makes total sense, since the blob of epoxy is most likely a micro controller. (Its a little timer).

You all should check out this LCD though, I have no idea how its even able to work.
The way it makes contact with the PCB is this flexible little bar, which I couldn't even measure any resistance or continuity. If you blow the picture up, you can see the bar is a bunch of panels stuck together, this is why it doesn't all short, but its still a mystery to me.

As for the LCD, you can see how its pins are just barely visible on the glass.
Its actually pretty crazy.

It literally just sits like that, the chip is under it.

Here you can see the bar that makes contact, as well as the pins on the glass.

They put a tiny little bit of conductive adhesive on it, and have employees that align them by hand in the factory.

LittleRain:
As for the LCD, you can see how its pins are just barely visible on the glass.
Its actually pretty crazy.

Oh..... those things! I think they have some kind of electrically conductive rubber contacts. And, maybe after some amount of time ---- aging, and changes in temperature, humidity etc, that sort of conductive rubber interface can lead to pesky issues ---- like the display becoming faded, or some numbers missing etc. Eg.... bending or flexing the chassis of casing can make the numbers darker or softer etc, or sometimes stops working altogether.

LittleRain:
The way it makes contact with the PCB is this flexible little bar, which I couldn’t even measure any resistance or continuity.

Google “zebrastrip”.
Leo…

The way it makes contact with the PCB is this flexible little bar, which I couldn't even measure any resistance or continuity.

Yes it is a mixture of very fine conducting rings on an insulator substrate, so it can carry multiple signals without shorting out.

I have found that once you have removed it then it never works properly again, there is always the odd connection that will not reconnect.

Yeah I can see how it would have issues.
Just like grumpy said I have not been able to get it to work correctly, all the wrong segments are lit up.

Ahh, pretty cool Leo.

all the wrong segments are lit up.

That is because of the angle of this strip to the top and bottom connectors. Unless they are aligned quite precisely the concentric rings along the tube can transfer the signals to the wrong places.