Can the ground pin of the arduino be lifted to a potential of 30 kV?

Hello,

I am new user and a friend of mine is working on switching of IGBT with emitter lifted at higher potential(30 kV). The schematic is shown in the attachment. Ideally, this is working in simulation.But in real case.I highly doubt the capability of the arduino and the gate driver IC. Could you please let us know if this will work in real time. If not, what can be done?

Image can be found here: Imgur: The magic of the Internet

Assuming Q1 is rated for well over 1kV I don't see anything wrong with that. I am going to assume that the person doing this knows how to work safely with 30kV (I don't!).

Remove the 30kV source while testing and debugging the circuit. Also reduce the 1kV to something less hazardous. Once it works, seal the circuit before connecting it to the high voltages.

I feel strongly that the answer must be NO for a person who has to ask this question on a Forum where s/he has no knowledge of the qualifications of the people giving advice.

Get professional advice before messing with lethal voltages.

...R

Agree ; not something for the non professional !

In any case tracking , static etc charge is likely to be an issue.

The Arduino needs to be kept at a low potential, with any switching done optically down a long insulated rod .

But don’t do it - if you ask here you don’t have the experience for this stuff .

DrDiettrich:
Remove the 30kV source while testing and debugging the circuit. Also reduce the 1kV to something less hazardous. Once it works, seal the circuit before connecting it to the high voltages.

Thank you for the suggestion.

Robin2:
I feel strongly that the answer must be NO for a person who has to ask this question on a Forum where s/he has no knowledge of the qualifications of the people giving advice.

Get professional advice before messing with lethal voltages.

...R

Thank you. It will be made a point that it will be verified by an experienced professional.

hammy:
Agree ; not something for the non professional !

In any case tracking , static etc charge is likely to be an issue.

The Arduino needs to be kept at a low potential, with any switching done optically down a long insulated rod .

But don’t do it - if you ask here you don’t have the experience for this stuff .

Very true. As insisted, I will ask for an experienced person's approval before doing it.

No ! Get the experienced person to do it !

Nothing obviously tells me it can not be done provided you have the appropriately rated parts - safety is an issue of course.

I can attest to static electricity build-up, I've worked with much lower voltages (5-20 kV mostly) and that was a voltage source of the kind that you could safely be shocked by. Soon after I got myself an antistatic bracelet as I got fed up with all the electric shocks I got, my body got charged just by being near the experiment so touching anything metal made sparks fly...

If you use the higher power kind of 30 kV supply (and the fact you have an IGBT I may assume at least the 1 kV is the powerful kind) this is simply an outright dangerous thing to do.

wvmarle:
Nothing obviously tells me it can not be done provided you have the appropriately rated parts - safety is an issue of course.

I can attest to static electricity build-up, I've worked with much lower voltages (5-20 kV mostly) and that was a voltage source of the kind that you could safely be shocked by. Soon after I got myself an antistatic bracelet as I got fed up with all the electric shocks I got, my body got charged just by being near the experiment so touching anything metal made sparks fly...

If you use the higher power kind of 30 kV supply (and the fact you have an IGBT I may assume at least the 1 kV is the powerful kind) this is simply an outright dangerous thing to do.

Dear wvmarle,

Thank you for the reply. I definitely understand that this is very dangerous from the answers. We will think of an alternative ( much safer option) instead.

hammy:
No ! Get the experienced person to do it !

Sure!