Can we build Big arms and grippers in factories using Arduino ?


Hello there
Please i have Question .
can i build big arms and Grippers in the same size in the photo using Arduino ?
and this Arms will be use in Factories ?
Best Regards

temboo-line.jpg

NO.

Large machines like that can cause serious injury and need to be controlled by professionally created control systems.

...R

If you have the skill then yes you can control things like this with an Arduino or few. But if you have to ask then you haven't got the skill.

Grumpy_Mike:
But if you have to ask then you haven’t got the skill.

I figured “NO” was simpler :slight_smile:

…R

The size of the arm is irrelevant to whether or not it CAN be controlled by this or that.

But as @Robin2 pointed out the Arduino is not appropriate for something that could maim or kill. For that you want something that is professionally designed.

Can you imagine the liability when your robot rips someone in half and they come and ask for the design engineers and drawings so they can decid who is at fault and all you have is a forum post on a hobbyist site?

Hi,
As this looks like an industrial bit of equipment, it will need to follow recognized safety rules.

Industrial grade controllers have this level of safety monitoring and are built/designed for this sort of operation.
Arduino does not offer these facilities.

Tom.... :slight_smile:

Mohamed2827:

Hello there
Please i have Question .
can i build big arms and Grippers in the same size in the photo using Arduino ?
and this Arms will be use in Factories ?
Best Regards

Do you have the metal shop capabilities to build the components? Can you build a cast metal base sturdy enough to support them? Will you have any people to help?

Paul

I’d be concerned about all the libraries you are likely* (edit: or be tempted) to end up using, with no real knowledge of how they work internally and what possible conflicts there might be between them. You might- for example- decide to use a library to take care of the inverse kinematics: you may find a few, and how do you choose the best, or even an acceptable one? You going to scratch around the playground here, and instructables and youtube and github, until you find one that does what you want? I’m happy to do that for a library for a sensor that might stop my $20 robot crashing into the wall, but might not want to use it where someone could lose an arm.

Let’s say you do some fairly decent testing and are happy with the library and its interaction with the hardware and other libraries. Then 6 months later you need to update your sketch to cater for a new requirement in your factory. You do that coding on a different PC from 6 months before, and download that same kinematics library- or you think you do anyway. Perhaps it’s been developed further and you don’t know that; or you might actually stumble across an older one. Real world testers will tell you all about regression testing, that is testing that checks that when you enhance some code in one way, that you don’t set it back (regress) in some other way. Did the author of the updated library check they broke nothing in the process? Do you do all your testing again, that you did when you first encountered the library? Apart from picking the library code apart yourself (and you can, after all you have the source) how do you know it’s (still) safe to use?

Will your factory management be ok with you using libraries you picked up off the playground on a hobby site? And by that I don’t mean any disrespect to the authors of such libraries. Those libraries may be really really good and have been carefully tested by the author for suitability in the author’s world, but you don’t really know how robust it is, and that a further change in the future (a change you might actually need) won’t undo or remove or damage a feature you need today and want to keep.

At its base, an Arduino is professional in the sense that the chips on there are designed for commercial use (with the usual disclaimers in the Atmel datasheet about medical, automotive etc use) but is the whole surrounding infrastructure robust enough for industrial use?

They used to say in the old days of DP that nobody ever got fired for buying IBM: I imagine that in the case of industry nobody ever got fired for buying PLCs from Siemens or Allen-Bradley (or other well known makes) or turnkey robotics solutions from the likes of Yaskawa Motoman.

*of course, you could write everything from scratch, and certify that everything’s safe.

Mohamed2827:

Hello there
Please i have Question .
can i build big arms and Grippers in the same size in the photo using Arduino ?
and this Arms will be use in Factories ?
Best Regards

i has been said that if you have to ask, you probably do not have the skills to do the task.
but, to your question about building big arms and grippers.
there are lots of photos on the web that show these style arms. most do a simple task like hold a paint gun to spray paint, and as shown in your photo, the area of movement is behind yellow screens to prevent humans from being in the way of the machines.
the first thing when building the arms is to make sure the range of motion is up to the expected task.
a welding robot arm has to hold the welding device at the correct angles. and has to reach all the right places.
also, the base is very important, there should not be any wobble or bounce when the are moves or stops.
In building such an arm, I would recommend seeing what construction type has been used. welding a arm together, or bolting plates of steel, or even pouring your own castings.

as to the comment that if you have to ask, then you probably cannot do it.
any fabricator or welder would tell you that they can build anything. most often you need to provide the plans and drawings.
and any engineer will tell you that they can design pretty much anything and make the plans and drawings.

have you built any large metal projects that would give you the confidence to build large arms like these ?

Then how can i build Arms like this ?
Which Part i should use ?

Can i build these Arms Using PLC ?

Mohamed2827:
Then how can i build Arms like this ?
Which Part i should use ?

Define "build"... do you mean literally from scratch including the mechanical design, or do you intend to take an existing machine and rip out the controls to stick a few Arduinoes in?

There's a reason those things cost the millions that they do: big international industrial outfits like Ysakawa Motoman have huge R&D labs and decades of experience, and engineers with degrees in mechatronics and all sorts of other quals.

Have you even tried to build and control one of these? Are you a mechanical / electrical / electronics / mechatronics engineer?

Mohamed2827:
Can i build these Arms Using PLC ?

No.
You might be able to control them using a PLC but building them needs a fully equipped workshop and lots of skill to use the tools and design the parts.

Assuming you can get the necessary knowledge and skills to design one of these things, and then get the necessary equipment, materials and facilities to actually build and program one, do you really think (and I ask this as gently as I can) anyone's going to say "Let's ignore the decades of know-how that our current supplier/s have built-up, and with whom we have decades of relationship and investment, and buy one from some guy who has never built one before and has to get help from a hobby forum"?

Oh, and what about all the certification for this equipment.

I was recently digging around on Pololu's website, and read about all the nightmares they had when they moved their factory from one state to another in the USA. Took them months to get the right stickers on the machines before they were allowed to turn them on, and those were machines from existing vendors.

Hi,

Can you please tell us your electronics, programming, Arduino, hardware experience?

Thanks.. Tom... :slight_smile:

I reckon this is just a Troll.

Nobody seriously thinking of building a complex machine like that could be so naive.

...R