check out the soldering on this!

http://www.qrp.pops.net/images/2009/mikes-memorial/A2-4066.JPG

i don't feel so bad about my own soldering now lol, how's that thing not shorting!

This is a very popular technic with radio amateurs called dead-bug prototyping. (Notice, the IC's are glued to the board upside down - dead bug style) There is also a related technique call Manhattan method where a PCB material is cut up into small pieces and glued to the copper board to act as small copper islands... in this case, the PCB is mainly used a ground plane except for the area near the caps at the top and near the toroid coil in the middle.

Radio frequency circuits do not work well on a solder-less breadboard... so this is prototyping for those sorts of circuits.

would perfboard do the job equally as well though?

i ferl sorry for radio enthusiasts in that case...

What is really wild is when someone does this, (yes I've done it) and then if it works as intended, "pot it" in epoxy resin. I have a Porsche ignition box that looked just about like this. Man, was that a challenge to fix. :astonished:

Looks like a new way of hot air soldering: Blow blobs of solder on to the joints.
Or would this be the origin of the BGA technique?

I will take that any day over this dead bug job ...

KirAsh4:
I will take that any day over this dead bug job ...

Oh, no way did anybody do that....!

LOL.

Heard about that.
Lead free solder is said to grow whiskers.
That must be some high testosterone chip..

cjdelphi:
would perfboard do the job equally as well though?

i ferl sorry for radio enthusiasts in that case...

Need the groundplane nearly everywhere - high gain high frequency circuits are always at risk
of unwanted oscillation without a good ground plane.

MAS3:
LOL.

Heard about that.
Lead free solder is said to grow whiskers.
That must be some high testosterone chip..

That ain't no dang whiskers! Those are actual coated wires, soldered one by one ... I don't want to be the person who had to do that to be honest.

Ball Grid Array without the right oven comes to mind.

KirAsh4:
I will take that any day over this dead bug job ...

:o far out.... it's alive!!!!!!!!

KirAsh4:
I will take that any day over this dead bug job ...

Must be a real pain to fix if there's a loose or broken wire in the middle. I see ONE wire not connected, near the left side of the CPU.

It takes real ball to wire up CPU in that small area.

More than likely, there was a symbol error, either mechanical or electrical, and that was the way to fix it for prototype testing.
We had shop ladies that pull off something like that in a few hours.
I had a board where a 64/72 bit EDAC chip had an undersized footprint selected by accident. We made a piece of PCB that the right sized pads, wired the board to the pads, and then the chip to the adapter board. Fixed the footprint on the next pass of the board.

cjdelphi:

http://www.qrp.pops.net/images/2009/mikes-memorial/A2-4066.JPG

i don't feel so bad about my own soldering now lol, how's that thing not shorting!

The late Jim Williams is a fan of this dead-bug style prototyping.

The points made about ground plane extend from the RF domain to the Digital one as well, particularly when converting from one domain to the other. All too frequently high speed D/A and A/D ‘first cuts’ don’t work properly. Especially low noise ones, when compared against the engineering sample. Even in that light “Dead Bug” is still my favorite Analog/RF construction technique… And the parts are 100% reusable.

Doc

Never a fan of that "clean desk policy" at work. I.... can.....kinda......relate. :zipper_mouth_face: Notice how his soldering pencil has a place of honor, right there in the middle.

And no modern, fancy "digital" scopes too!

He's a big fan of tektronix scopes too.

vasquo:
The late Jim Williams is a fan of this dead-bug style prototyping.

Wow! And I thought my desk was untidy....