Chinese power supply: Name this part!

This is a "10 amp" power supply, 12v. Finely crafted in China, imported device I am sure. It ran for about 6-9 months in my ceiling, attached to 4 LED strips. Did the job until today. There is also a fluorescent lighting fixture in the same ceiling I have not yet swapped out for LED (yet)... When I turn the lights on, the florescent one turns on first, then the LED lights turn on. I guess the fluorescent ballast sucks all the power to charge up whatever is in there which I do not know.

Oh forget it. 15 minutes of playing games trying to upload the pictures, now I am too frustrated to continue. I can try again later when the forum software stops discriminating against me for my 1mb pictures.

DocStein99:
This is a "10 amp" power supply, 12v. Finely crafted in China, imported device I am sure. It ran for about 6-9 months in my ceiling, attached to 4 LED strips. Did the job until today. There is also a fluorescent lighting fixture in the same ceiling I have not yet swapped out for LED (yet)... When I turn the lights on, the florescent one turns on first, then the LED lights turn on. I guess the fluorescent ballast sucks all the power to charge up whatever is in there which I do not know.

If your fluorescent light runs on DC, there is no ballast. Only on AC powered florescent lights.

Paul

The flourescent lights run off 110/120v AC. They have a big fat heavy ballast. I turn on power, count maybe 1.5 seconds and then POOF they are on. I do not know how / if that affects the wonderful imported China power supply I have.

I tried to upload pictures of the power supply and part that blew out - after 12 attempts I give up.

I do not know how / if that affects the wonderful imported China power supply I have.

It doesn't. Or at least, if it does there is something seriously wrong with your wiring.

Some power supplies take a second or so to start up, they don't start instantly.

Florescent lights also don't start instantly.

Nothing you have said suggests a problem to me.

Sounds like the LED supply can't handle the high voltage spikes on the mains created by the fluoroscent
light fittings. Perhaps some better protection with MOV on the input to the supply might have helped.

Good job it's a 'wonderful' chinese supply, you would not want to hide a poor quality one in a ceiling would you ?

The whole point for me put LED lights in was so that I did not need to be bothered with the ceiling tiles changing the florescent bulbs anymore. Now the power supply fails. Replacing a $.60 bulb problem with a $12.00 power supply problem is so typical of me.

I have to assume my wiring was fair if it worked without problems for over a year. I probably should replace the other florescent fixture with LEDs, and use one of my spare scrap computer AT power supplies to run them both.

Use one of my spare scrap computer AT power supplies to run them both.

I collect old power supplies, I have boxes of them in the attic. Always useful for this kind of thing. If I see any electronic equipment being thrown out I make sure I get the power supply off it.

And like me, how often do we use them? :sunglasses:


Actually, that said, the already-dodgy PSU in my Dell Windoze server at work failed after 6 or 7 years and is of course, a peculiar and irreplaceable form factor, so the machine now resides with its cover off and an old large "tower" PSU sitting loose on top. So that is one.

Hi,
Dodgey Chinese power supplies in the ceiling!!!!
Looking for trouble......
In fact ANY heat producing electronics in the ceiling, must be looking for trouble.

In the news, dodgey Chinese outer building cladding, fires killing people.

Tom.... :frowning:

PS, How big is the image in Mb that you are trying to post and what format?

I have my choice of Chinese fire hazards to mount into the ceiling; the small new one or the used pull from a 15 year old computer that probably has 5 years of hours on it already.

The last file I tried to upload was 40,862 bytes, and "Size on disk" says 1,048,576 bytes (1 mb). Between the power supplies and this forum software I can not get either of them to work correctly.

With a fully enclosed steel case, it is not too likely to cause a fire. Put a second steel cover over it (but allow end ventilation) and make sure nothing flammable nearby.

Hard to say whether the new one or the 5 year used one will last longer. Luck of the draw; depends on which component batch was dodgy. :roll_eyes: