Clarification on power source(s)?

I had a quick question about power sources. (I have a Arduino Uno)

If I wanted to create a project that used a servo, a bunch of LEDs, a PIR sensor (aka motion detector), sonic distance detector, two lasers, a speaker, and some other things, what is the best way to power all of that with the breadboards? Would simply using my USB and connecting all the breadboards to each other work? I made a (very) crude example with Fritzing (attached as jpg) to try and convey what I mean. Basically, “piggybacking” off of the breadboard.

Or do I need to get some kind of alternate source of power? If so, would you mind describing what I should use? I am thinking I’ll want an external source, but am unsure of what I would look into.

Thanks for any ideas/help!

FYI: I don’t have any real projects in mind, I’m just wondering if there’s a point when adding things to the breadboard that I should start using ‘external’ (meaning not just USB cord) power and how I would regulate such power.

Piethon:
If I wanted to create a project that used a servo, a bunch of LEDs, a PIR sensor (aka motion detector), sonic distance detector, two lasers, a speaker, and some other things, what is the best way to power all of that with the breadboards?

you will need sufficient power to drive all of this. Also, you will need to isolate their respective power requirements such that they are not affecting one another when their respective power needs spike or dip.

the power needs are easily calculable. Isolating them from one another is possible but you will need assistance to make sure that it is done correctly.

If you plug a 9V Wall-wart into the UNO external power barrel jack you can supply close to 1 A (800mA).
You can bus everything else to the UNO +5 V.

raschemmel:
If you plug a 9V Wall-wart into the UNO external power barrel jack you can supply close to 1 A (800mA).
You can bus everything else to the UNO +5 V.

But, you should allow and Amp for a servo, so it really does need to be powered externally from the Arduino. Just make sure you hook all the grounds together.

Edit… pic attached

Many servos- small V2.jpg

The whole circus depends on the servo, about which you say nothing.

It doesn't matter how big the power supply is, each I/O pin on the Uno is still only good for 40mA. If the servo demands ten times that, remember where you heard it first. It is commonplace to have a separate power supply for servos and, If by bunch you really mean a lot of LEDs, you might use it to power those too.

JimboZA:

raschemmel:
If you plug a 9V Wall-wart into the UNO external power barrel jack you can supply close to 1 A (800mA).
You can bus everything else to the UNO +5 V.

But, you should allow and Amp for a servo, so it really does need to be powered externally from the Arduino. Just make sure you hook all the grounds together.

Edit… pic attached

Is either of the attached pictures a good way to power the servo (or whatever) with additional power sources? I think the picture with the 9V going to the breadboard is the better way? Or am I missing something completely? I see your schematic, but what kind of power source should I use, if not a 9V or something like a AA battery holder?

(edit: again, the images are very general, just for getting some clarification, I don’t expect everything is connected properly).

Power example with servo1.jpg

Power example with servo2.jpg

Electrically speaking, connecting the battery direct to the servo or via the breadboard is the same. But from a practical point, the breadboard's more flexible since you can add more servos or other 9V powered stuff more easily.

I'm not expert on batteries: the real gurus seem to be the RC fraternity since so much of what they do uses battery power and they know the best makes and types and sizes etc. But yep try an AA holder. Just be aware that rechargeables are, afaik, 1.2V so it's 5 for 6V as opposed to the old school 1.5s which needs 4 for 6V. I have seen holders for 5x AAs, and also a single AA holder that attached to a 4x holder to give the 5th one.

But yep try an AA holder. Just be aware that rechargeables are, afaik, 1.2V so it's 5 for 6V as opposed to the old school 1.5s which needs 4 for 6V. I have seen holders for 5x AAs, and also a single AA holder that attached to a 4x holder to give the 5th one.

You can get a six battery holder like below and just put in 5 batteries and jumper the sixth battery slot.