Clock based camera intervalometer

I would like to make the smallest simplest cheapest device that does the following:

  • Has user programmable LCD+buttons

  • Allows user via LCD to set clock time

  • Allows user via LCD to set the start and end time of intervalometer function (an intervalometer triggers a camera to take photos at a certain frequency)

  • Allows user via LCD to set the intervalometer frequency from anywhere between once per second to once per day

  • Allows user via LCD to set intervalometer to only function during periods of light (via simple photoresistor)

  • Can be powered via USB

  • Ideally retains clock time via backup battery

My thought was to purchase this kit since it has an LCD, buttons, and other things to learn with. But then it occurred to me that it might not have a clock function and certainly doesn’t seem to have a backup battery. I see there are a few RTC options including this one. My question at this point is whether folks think I should get a full Arduino UNO R3 or a smaller cheaper unit since most of my functions are simply around time.

Thanks!

homemadefrog:
My thought was to purchase this kit since it has an LCD, buttons, and other things to learn with. But then it occurred to me that it might not have a clock function and certainly doesn’t seem to have a backup battery.

Those kits never seem much of a buy, what with all that stuff you don’t need, and not the stuff you do. I think you are better off trawling eBay.

I see there are a few RTC options including this one.

The DS3231 is excellent, reliable and cheap. The DS1307 is a lot smaller and may be quite satisfactory. I use the same code for both.

My question at this point is whether folks think I should get a full Arduino UNO R3 or a smaller cheaper unit since most of my functions are simply around time.

It is hard to advise you and it might depend on how handy you are with a soldering iron but, since you ask the question, probably the Uno - at least to start with. It is simply more convenient and made for development. You might then move to a Nano or Pro Mini for the final product. They are dirt cheap and use the same code.

Nick_Pyner: It is hard to advise you and it might depend on how handy you are with a soldering iron but, since you ask the question, probably the Uno - at least to start with. It is simply more convenient and made for development. You might then move to a Nano or Pro Mini for the final product. They are dirt cheap and use the same code.

Seconded (and Karma given.)