clock 'gear' motor..... stepper motor?

I'm looking for a small gear motor I could hook up to a 12 volt current (say an AC adapter off a wall socket) that would turn continuously such as one that could turn say dummy wooden gears just for display on a clock.

I've heard of stepper motors which I think is what I'm looking for, but some of these require additional circuitry and I can't seem to confirm.

For example this:

https://reprapchampion.com/products/nema-17-high-torque-stepper-motor-78-oz-in-cnc-mill-router-3d-printer-prusa-i3?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=googlepla&variant=12136722182&gclid=CPO9osPqz80CFdgNgQodSNkDDg

and this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mabuchi-12V-Hobby-Motor-Model-RS-385SH-/161981974726?hash=item25b6e0c8c6:g:TOYAAOSw~OVWxhfD

As it would be part of a clock it would be running basically forever as long as its plugged in, so the burnout is also a factor. I know some of these hobby motors are only intended to run for short periods. I would just want to hook this directly up to the 12 volt wires running off the wall adapter.

Can anyone help with suggestions? Thanks!

I would just want to hook this directly up to the 12 volt wires running off the wall adapter.

Then a stepping motor is not for you, it needs a microprocessor attached to it to make it run.

As it would be part of a clock

Then you need a synchronous AC motor so the time is kept accurately. With the mains any long term frequency drift is compensated for by slightly adjusting the mains frequency.

Google for
ac synchronous clock motors

This is a typical one:-

As it would be part of a clock it would be running basically forever as long as its plugged in, so the burnout is also a factor. I know some of these hobby motors are only intended to run for short periods. I would just want to hook this directly up to the 12 volt wires running off the wall adapter.

Why ?

Why? Well because in this case the clock runs on a 12 volt AC adapter, and I wanted to add a dummy moving gear to it in this project.
So, if the clock runs off 12 volts, in theory could you not chain the motor on to the power circuit, and run both?
Stop me if I'm wrong.

Here's a couple:

"1 W Torque"

"Low Speed high torque"

I think the stick and bolt would work better, but not quite sure on the 1W Torque as opposed to 'high torque'. How much torque is 1W? Speed is not an issue but I'd want as much torque as possible I would imagine.

So, if the clock runs off 12 volts, in theory could you not chain the motor on to the power circuit, and run both?
Stop me if I'm wrong.

I am not familiar with your wording. What does "chain the motor on to the power circuit," mean ?

Are you talking about driving one motor from another using a chain and sprocket or what ?

"chain" is not an electronics term and my specialty is electronics and this is the General Electronics forum so what exactly does "chain " mean (in your mind) ?

I think the stick and bolt would work better, but not quite sure on the 1W Torque as opposed to 'high torque'. How much torque is 1W? Speed is not an issue but I'd want as much torque as possible I would imagine.

1 horse power is 746 W (or there abouts) so 0.00134048257372654155495978552279 Horse power.

I am not familiar with your wording>>

Welcome to my world :slight_smile:

I tend to get aggravated myself when people use terminology that they pretty much know in advance most people don't understand.
But that was not my intent. By 'chain' in this instance, I merely meant connect it to the circuit. Whether correct or not, in my field of work, we call 'daisy chaining' connecting several devices together in a series.
For example in the below diagram:

By tapping into the red and black wires in this picture, with both tapped wires running to separate bulb, you now have two bulbs which are lighted by the single power source.

I'm going to assume 1W torque means "1 Watt of Torque", as that seems to be what most laymen would venture to guess.
And that 2W torque would mean more torque then 1W.
Correct?

However they don't seem to want to make it that easy, as I've noticed many motors being sold simply have no torque value being posted, or if it is, it is masked under the guise of a different variable.

By tapping into the red and black wires in this picture, with both tapped wires running to separate bulb, you now have two bulbs which are lighted by the single power source.

That's not daisy chaining, the way you worded it. That's called in parallel. If you mean "in series" then you will need to post a schematic of what you mean because what you have just described with words is called "in parallel".
If you meant in series, then you would have had to word it as follows:

"by breaking the circuit and inserting another lamp, you now have two lamps in series" (STILL NOT CALLED DAISY CHAINING because this is the General Electronics Topic.

Welcome to my world

By tapping into the red and black wires in this picture, with both tapped wires running to separate bulb, you now have two bulbs which are lighted by the single power source.

Well that's going to be true whether the bulbs are in series or parallel so it is not very helpful in describing what you are talking about.

Please post a schematic of what you mean.

Yeah, daisy chain usually refers to a data bus, such as firewire or i2c, where one device plugs into the next in the line. The word "connect in (series or parallel)" is probably the best term to use, because it is less ambiguous.

I would suggest using the synchronous 1RPM motor that Mike linked to in reply #1. It runs off the mains, because it uses the 60Hz signal to keep the motor synched to the time. That way, you just hook it up to your seconds spindle in the clock. If all you are doing is turning a clock, then you don't need a lot of torque.

A stepper motor is intermediate on the 'easiness spectrum'. You can however, turn it as accurately as you'd like. Typically small clocks use a single pole stepper that is pretty easy to adapt to Arduino control. The book by Simon Field called Electronics for Artists has a whole section on how to extract those motors from a clock for use with a microprocessor.

Otherwise, I'd use a 28BYJ48 5 volt stepper, they are cheap and easily available.

One of these will run for a year on a pencell.

http://www.lightinthebox.com/quartz-clock-movement-mechanism-gold-hands-diy-repair-parts_p2051338.html?currency=GBP&litb_from=paid_adwords_shopping&utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=cpc&adword_mt=&adword_ct=73694389972&adword_kw=&adword_pos=1o7&adword_pl=&adword_net=g&adword_tar=&adw_src_id=1465939714_290321332_26701154452_pla-193314536932&gclid=COD3kJrC0M0CFYcp0wod79YCuQ

It will power a paper clock with gears of 9in diameter quite well

The size , mass and bearings of your wooden gears may be a different story.
Can you give more detail.

I'm going to assume 1W torque means "1 Watt of Torque", as that seems to be what most laymen would venture to guess.

Then they would be wrong. You simple don't measure torque in watts. The units of torque are force and distance.
I have no idea what 1W torque is supposed to mean and I suspect the person writing it has no idea also.

Grumpy_Mike:
Then they would be wrong. You simple don't measure torque in watts. The units of torque are force and distance.
I have no idea what 1W torque is supposed to mean and I suspect the person writing it has no idea also.

It was a description of a torque motor originally - 1W torque motor and 2W torque motor. See reply #3

MarkT:
It was a description of a torque motor originally - 1W torque motor and 2W torque motor. See reply #3

Yes but it doesn't alter the fact that a watt is not in the same units as torque.
Google units of torque and you get

Torque has dimension force times distance, symbolically L2MT−2. Official SI literature suggests using the unit newton metre (N⋅m) or the unit joule per radian. The unit newton metre is properly denoted N⋅m or N m.

So there is no way that just a watt can be a measure of torque.

The two links in reply #3 do not specify torque in watts at all but in proper units of oz / inch or Newton / meter.

jeffpas:
Speed is not an issue but I'd want as much torque as possible I would imagine.

For a clock? Are you recreating Big Ben?

@OP,
Torque (as far as a clock is concerned), is not a "variable". It's a "parameter".

So you are simply saying both clock motors connected to the SAME power terminals ?

  • 1W torque motor and 2W torque motor.

Parse your text carefully.
"1W (Torque Motor)" makes perfect sense...

In any case, you want a "gear motor" of some kind. A stepper motor needs active electronics to make it rotate.
If the motor is just for looks, any sort of gear motor will work. The synchronous motors that several people have mentioned are specialized to run at a constant RPM regulated by the frequency of their AC supply (which is very constant if you're talking about the AC mains, so it makes for accurate clocks.) They won't run off of 12VDC, though.

That explains the confusion about "1W ". not being a correct measurement of torque.
It never was. It was the POWER rating of the TORQUE MOTOR ( which, to be honest, I have never heard of but sounds like a type of motor that has many applications).